Jump to content
The Corroboree

Recommended Posts

Can't help with quercus or truffles but I have a bunch of different hazelnuts I could send you some cuttungs if you're interested.. multiple different commercial varieties, not sure which sorry.. 30 odd year old trees.. is too warm here so they don't set fruit :(

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi ph ive recently been looking into the same thing although haven't heard of T. lyonii. There are a few cork oaks around here but i missed acorn season. Will try grabbing a couple of vigorous looking epicormic shoots to try propagating, if I manage to I can send you some. I have a small slice of dried tassie black truffle i could send you for inoculantpost-251-0-22787200-1408955544_thumb.jpg

(i think this one maybe about to germinate)

post-251-0-18103400-1408955647_thumb.jpg

paradox im going to bother you in PM :wink:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

paradox, this is interesting, so your hazels, survive the warm climate, but don't set fruit, but this could be good enough, for this project.

I ruled hazel as a host out, because, I thought it would not survive the heat at my location.

so maybe, I will take you on, with this offer, thank you.

ferret, so your slice of truffle is a, tuber melanosporum?

I think sourcing a cork oak, will be easy, so no worries. and if not, I can wait another year.

the cork oak could be cool though, even if the whole idea, will not work.

my place, more than likely will not produce enough hours below 7 deg C, to induce fruiting...., that's why I chase lyonii, which maybe, would fruit with less, hours below 7 deg C.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking into truffles a few years back.................a major local nursery stocks many inoculated trees, the ones you mention & pine nuts...which love the heat. Try parks/botanical gardens for nuts. Plant Autumn.

A problem is competing fungi....so maybe using root stock from non truffled establish trees is not a good idea,,,,

I did feel the earliest way to build stock plants would be to buy an inoculated tree/sapling, & plant it in a huge box with sterilised soil, then plant washed/surface sterilised acorns/nuts in with it.........My place was too coastal & water logged in the winter for truffles....

not sure if that's any help...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

paradox, this is interesting, so your hazels, survive the warm climate, but don't set fruit, but this could be good enough, for this project.

I ruled hazel as a host out, because, I thought it would not survive the heat at my location.

so maybe, I will take you on, with this offer, thank you.

yeah i'm not sure how they'd go at your place, perhaps too hot & dry? The place these hazelnuts grow is warm temperate really, with a slight sub tropical & slight coastal influence so it does kind of get pretty cold in winter but not all that cold & it does get hot in summer but with nice forested valley protection & a tinge of coastal air that sometimes blows over the mountains.

we can grow a lot of things but many of the classic cool temperate fruit trees don't fruit well & most true tropicals can't cope with the winter frosts. Lots of other stuff does though : ) anyway PM if you're keen!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

do they sell truffle trees there yet?

...usually quercus robur, fagus sylvatica and corylus are sold here ready infected and they seem to go for anything between £7.50 - £50

planting them in a nice collection of any of those species ensures the lot will get infected ... harvest estimated after about 25-50 years...

definitely a long term investment worth while...

the searing heat makes me think of alba truffle infection... mmmm

-edit- , sorry dreamwalker , just realised your post already answered this -

Edited by ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A problem is competing fungi....

i guess thats why you can't inoculate a mature tree. seems so obvious now, never really thought about it. It' sure is annoying having this nice little mature hazelnut grove with no nuts or truffles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thunder, yes they sell inoculated trees in oz, they are ~ 44aud for a 30cm tree, and btw, some people reported, they got sizeable truffles after only 3 years, but average is around 6 to 7 years.

contams are a real issue, and it's said that some nurseries are contaminated badly, so maybe better to do, your own inoculation, which means pouring spore slurry over the seedlings, something that sounds easy, cough, cough, apart from contam issues....

I read that, truffles (non food) are abundant in oz, they said every field trip, they discover new species, and at times even new genera!!

so keeping them (the wild ones) off, would be a must.

os, nurseries are contaminated with chinese truffle....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the chinese truffles, are edible and have some value, but they mostly get used as, a much cheaper alternative (for flavouring manufactured food) to the gourmet black and white truffles.

as far as my understanding goes, none of the ozzi native truffles, have any potential, to enter the food or gourment food market.

maybe oz is rich in truffles, because generally, the soils here are very poor...

I am not sure, but maybe the native truffles are as well very small in size only...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i've just had some thoughts about hazelnuts. Seeing as hardwood cuttings are problematic (thanks ferret), apart from propagating suckers i've been looking into air layering & it seems very promising. It occurred to me this may be a perfect way to create & inoculate trufflized clones. inoculate the sterile air layer medium & away you go, 6 months later you have lovely semi advanced truffle saplings. Seems this would be a good method for mass production if you have a good mature hazel grove. i know next to nothing about truffle production so no idea how workable this is, depends on how picky the spores are in terms of conditions etc.. but it seems logical & enticingly simple..

I think i've just found another new project : ) will report back when i've learned a lot more about truffles ; )

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah air layering sounds good ...probably want it to be as big a bag as possible to avoid over heating...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

paradox, that is an exciting idea, but will the fungus survive the period, till roots as host are available?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

probably not, as long as you could keep the medium as sterile as possible while the roots develop & perhaps inject inoculum into medium when the roots are well formed & you're close to planting out?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep you wanna get a bunch of healthy root tips growing before inoculating. girdle root suckers with twist tie, air layer with sterile medium, once you have roots simply dip in inoculant (dried truffle cut with vermiculite in blender) and pot on into sterilized soil. Ensure high pH to optimize and select for truffle growth.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

probably not means, the fungus will not survive any periode without a host, or do you mean if sterile, it will survive for some time ?

(obsolete question now, as it has been answered, whilst I was composing, cheers, ferret) :)

"grow your own truffles on the window sill, dreaming"

Edited by planthelper
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that t. melanosporum grows better on "quercus ilex" roots than Q. suber. In Spain the best places for tuber culture, are zones of high altitude(above 600m over sea level), chilly temperatures (no more of 30ºC in summer), mediterranean rainy season and sandy lime soils.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sasca, I heard the same, but quercus ilex, will not grow at my area, whilst suber does.

carya illinoensis, the pecan nut does grow alright in my garden, and thats' why I chase tuber lyonii.

I was told in a conversation, with a host tree nurseryman, that not heat is the problem, but one needs 1400h below 7 deg C. that's 8 weeks, I manage at my location maybe, 2 or 3 weeks, with this temperature.

my gamble is, that tuber lyonii, has a lesser chill requirement.

has anybody of you experience with getting a fungus through quarantine?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

im looking for fagacea natul tortuosa .... it's European Beech Fagus sylvatica 'Tortuosa'

twisted / dwarf / common Beech. found from the film "The fountain" that presented this tree as
Fagacea natul tortuosa. I am having difficulty locating the seeds or th plant to purchase online.
so, i was hoping I might find some help amongst the great minds of SAB ^_^

FagusTortuosaLauenau01.jpg

fountain1.jpg

fo28lg.jpg

thank you all so very much.
may be listed as Fagus tortuosa

Edited by bio
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bio, I am pretty sure any of the fagus will not grow/survive your location, they need a cold climat.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

incase they do ... i found a copper one , dnno about import export details tho

http://www.bluebellnursery.com/catalogue/trees/Fagus/F/3072?gclid=CPPKwPOhy8ACFaYIwwodhTYARA

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not 100% sure, but back in Austria I know a blutbuche (blood beech) and it could be what they/ you call a copper.

it's one of my favourite trees, and I always visit it, when I return to the place of my birth.

it's quite big though, rather 20m tall or more.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thank you very much! I think I may end up with fagus sylvatica pendula ... closest to that beautiful contorted beech I've found so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×