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3rdI

Mimosa hostilis

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Hey guys just a quick question. Why is it at the end of the day in my grow closet, I find my 6 month old mimosa babies all droopy? Is this a sign of a hard days growing? They are watered every few days, as soon as the first few inches are dry. They have been growing steadily since germination so I was just wondering if anybody knows what this is about. Sorry for poor photo quality, my camera cant keep up with the strobe of my HIDs

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post-14497-0-97628400-1402135158_thumb.j

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That's a normal response for Mimosaceae, Acacias do it too. Many other plants do it to a lesser extent, cannabis being one that comes to mind.

The plant shuts down when it's genetic programming dictates. Although we like to blast them with extended lighting periods in the hope they'll grow more, tropical and temperate species are generally adapted to more balanced lighting cycles with seasonal variation.

I've come to believe that when a species shows signs of shutting down at the end of the lighting period then that's about the maximum photoperiod needed for maximum growth. Any extra time with the light on is mostly wasted.

Cannabis growers are notorious for trying extend the photoperiod way beyond what the genetics of the plant are adapted to. Once the plants lose turgor they are shutting down for the night and extra time under the light is for the most part wasted energy.

So IMO when you observe them shutting down for the night you may as well turn the light off.

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but, there is as well a chance that, your plants are not hostillis, but something else.

hostillis, does not fold down the leaves much when they go to sleep...

are the leaves as well sensitive to the touch?

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I have MImosa Hostilis and they close up like that from what i have seen.

I know many acacia and mims have thorns but if this plant has thorns i would say it is MH. I have always known all my mimoa hostilis to close up like this at night time and if it rains or is a little nippy

I tried to add pictures of my mimosas but apparently they are too pic so i have to change their file size.

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but, there is as well a chance that, your plants are not hostillis, but something else.

hostillis, does not fold down the leaves much when they go to sleep...

are the leaves as well sensitive to the touch?

Mine fold down at night, I'm no expert on identifying Mimosas though so I suppose I could have something else. The seeds came from the SAB nursery from one of their trees. It seems like hostilis to me, it has upward facing thorns and the foliage seems spot on. I' suppose I'll know for sure when they flower.

Mine are sensitive to water on the foliage but don't react to touch like a pudica.

The folding down effect was more pronounced when they were seedlings but they still display this trait.

I found a few images on the herbalistics site and the plant in one of the pics seems to be exibiting that trait, albeit to a lesser extent than mine did when they were smaller. Now they are a bit bigger they fold down slightly more than the one is this pic.

Mimosa_hostilis.jpg

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My seedlings fold up at the hottest part of the day and at night.

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Does anyone know what temperatures Mimosa Hostilis will tolerate?

Edited by Dale

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Does anyone know what temperatures Mimosa Hostilis will tolerate?

I'll let you know at the end of winter. ;)

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