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mutant

This section needs a "show wild finds" thread

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whoah! way to go dude! :o:wub:

wood blewits are one of the prettiest ever

if thats what the purples are :P

tiny one mid-left looks exactly like the ones here, if those big basts are also them woooooo!

nev seen em that big b4

Edited by ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ
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I dont go with common names, it doesn connect well internationally anyways and I dont use them, only know them from the books and the internet. But yeah they purple ones were Lepista nuda, it was a pretty cool batch. And yeah they're pretty. They also dry very well, they excellent dried.

Other than that, I dont know which tiny you mean and what you are asking.

In the carton There are 2 Leccinum above

and 2 wood agarcius (silvicola) in the middle

and piles

of Hydnum rufescnes, Cantharellus cibarius, Lepista nuda & Craterellus cornucopiodes

Edited by mutant

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i think this is a Ramaria spp. but not really sure which one. found in northern NSW near Nightcap national park at the base of an acacia melanoxylon.

post-13531-0-47293200-1418543323_thumb.j

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lepista nuda is the one , we call em wood blewits (pronounced bloo weeze)

lepista saeva are field blewits , there's 2 in one of my recent posts on this thread (post #95 pic 3)

I used to think they were called blueys before I'd sat with some literature and started studying edible wild ones

anyhow... happy hunting!

ps

good for you for not going with common names, i used to be the same

but memory lacking for the taxonomy... tends to have me coughing out common names,

in a way- that's the reason i posted here lol - save me having to label them each,

but yes, very confusing internationally using common names (especially talking house plants with folk in usa too)

I'll try sticking to internationally recognised naming or none at all , but will probably forget a few times lol

my original reason (looking back) for not using common names initially was that stupid one "fairy ring champignon" (marasmius oreades) since the common name is applicable to so many...

so yeah,... good call

and to reiterate : fkn nice to see such huge lepista nuda!!! - nice to see any really, but still , whoppers mate!

Edited by ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ
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This is a Ramaria sp. actually pretty hard to determine spcies, probably needs microscopy.

A european species is Ramaria aurea

TI>> feel free to use common names, but, like I said, it doesn't always help

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some panaeolus sp. in various states of decomposition. hard to identify them when they are like this, but from my experience the blackening with age is a sign of psilybin. the fatter stems on the two on the left, however, say possibly antillarum, but my instinct on the one on the right was active.

post-6519-0-50552200-1418895297_thumb.jp

Edited by ∂an
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the right one seems like one, yeah

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What better way to bring in the new year than a mushroom forage. Please help me ID the photos marked with (?)

1) Panaeolous sp. (?)

post-6519-0-27614300-1420112074_thumb.jp

2) Psilocybe cubensis

post-6519-0-60101400-1420112236_thumb.jp

3) (?)

post-6519-0-60104900-1420112336_thumb.jp

4) (?)

post-6519-0-87266500-1420112402_thumb.jp

5) Psilocybe cubensis

post-6519-0-83354400-1420112462_thumb.jp

6) Panaeolous sp. (?)

post-6519-0-45716200-1420112581_thumb.jp

7) Psilocybe cubensis

post-6519-0-85745700-1420112652_thumb.jp

8) (?)

post-6519-0-90205000-1420112705_thumb.jp

9) (?)

post-6519-0-08540000-1420112846_thumb.jp

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3,4 might be agaricus (ring missing or spoilt by rain) - 4 is being eaten my mold

8 is an agaricus

9 might be worn out BOvista sp Lycoperdon sp and similar AKA puffballs

love to see cubensis in the wild

about Pans, one cannot say, as we cant see the gills.. they should be dark gray / black

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a lone panaeolus / coplendia. looks different to cyanescens on initial inspection; more earthy tones than the usual white. strong blueing reaction upon handling.

post-6519-0-82167400-1421316260_thumb.jp

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subbalteatus?

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i ate thesepost-14443-0-09641800-1424211253_thumb.jpost-14443-0-12793700-1424211265_thumb.j :3

and made tea with thesepost-14443-0-74117000-1424211268_thumb.jand then ate them after anyway :3

and then lol i found this dumped close by , can anybody ID thispost-14443-0-33972900-1424211282_thumb.jplant material ?

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!!!! what did you thiink the first ones were and ate them? I hope you're fine :)

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they're flammulina velutipes , or wild velvet shank.. I know them very well indeed and have been picking and eating from this stretch spanning maybe 10 yrs now ;)

they come in 2 colours here, yellowy orangey red, and light yellow

..your gourmets are so damned good too btw :drool2:

very useful atm

Edited by ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ
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oh its that thing... explains it fruits also in cold weather.. haven't found them locally

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subbalteatus?

yeah the cap looks similar but the stem in this one is much thinner than seems to be typical for cinctulus. plus that mushroom is not that common in this part of australia as far as i am aware, and this mushrooms was very strong in alkaloids.

it looks similar to the mushrooms referred to as psilocybe coprophila and panaeolous sphinctrinus (inactive) on this page:

http://www.mushroomjohn.org/ruminantsandhabitats15.htm

I think there are at least three dung loving active species in oz

Edited by ∂an
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Was really looking forward to hunting after all that rain that hit SE Qld but I have not had the chance to get out. I did find these on a local nature strip in a shady spot. Trying to ID on the net I think it's a variety of Lepiota.

post-16071-0-82985500-1425303088_thumb.j

Edited by Kallangur.4503
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Chlorophyllum molybdites.

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Chlorophyllum/Macrolepiota I agree

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