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mutant

This section needs a "show wild finds" thread

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This section seriously needs a non- ID "show of your wild finds" thread, pinned I would say

oh yes it started

Macrolepiota procera

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Edited by mutant
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I think these are Coprinus comatus - growing on a lawn as I walked by

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These were in the bushes next to the aforementioned lawn

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Yes sir they are indeed.

And other ones look a lot like tuft of seemingly overripe Armillaria mellea , but I could be wrong just seeing the cap from above only

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found on side of the road. spore print pink.
valvariella speciosa I believe.

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have not been able to identify this one

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looks a lot like a volvariella but I cannot see the volva

the second might be some Chlorophyllum

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I found this lovely Terana caerulea on a recent rainforest walk. Apparently its common names are "cobalt crust" and "blue velvet on a stick", lol. I like the older classification - Pulcherricium caerulea, from the Latin pulcher meaning "beautiful". "Beautiful Blue" does seem to be a fitting name.

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very pretty , very few fungi have blue colours

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P.Cubensis was in absolute abundance locally, however the star attraction was this Calvatia craniformis which looked just like a brain in the middle of the most spiritual feeling patch of land I've ever walked.

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Once sliced, it was just like a sectioned brain - or even a loaf of bread, complete with butter.

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Edit: The pictures barely do it justice. This fungi held it's own sitting next to Mushrooms Demystified. It's a wonderful, very large specimen :)

Edited by Exogenesis
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Went for a big wander around some local spots yesterday and found all sorts of interesting things, thought I would share my finds. I'm no expert, but I do my research so I'll try to name things when I think I can:

Geastrum saccatum - The Rounded Earthstar

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Also, this solitary one in another area - I'm not sure if it is the same species however.

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Not sure about this one - possibly a Mycena viscidocruenta, At the time of photo, I failed to check for the tiny hairlike structures coming from the top of the cap (I certainly don't see any in this blurry photo) and I didn't look under the cap to look at the gills.

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This one looks very similar in colour and size, but I think it is a different species. Note the lack of 'grooves' on the cap (I don't know what the term is for these 'grooves'). I believe it could be Callistosporium - "dry red".

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My buddy found this intense one. It is clearly some form of Bolete and bruised blue very rapidly - but it doesn't seem to be "Bolete 'rapid bluer'.

It could be Leccinum scabrum - a Birch bolete - as it was found near a huge crop of Amanita muscaria, funny thing is, I could see a single Birch anywhere. I couldn't even work out why the A. muscaria were in such abundance.

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This solitary and mutilated Amanita Muscaria was in a very different spot - I'd never seen these grow in this condition before - again, no Birch trees were near.

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No prizes for this one. Can be seen pretty much all year round - super pretty and always a pleasure to find.

Mycena interrupta

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I have no idea what this is, this big slimy thing was a shock to come across and the fortunately the only one I found.

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those 2 red ones are beautiful - they could be the same

love to seeing mushrooms from such a different continent!

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I found 2 nice Boletus Edulis in the Adelaide Hills yesterday. Apparently it's the only place in Australia where they grow and it's a pretty recent discovery, (I think about 4 - 5 years). All Edulis recorded so far are within an 8km radius of each other in a certain range of elevation with 3 different kinds of imported trees.

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Hmmmmm could be aereus and not edulis...

awesome find, strange to hear they 're so rare over there

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Very interesting. I haven't heard of Boletus Aereus being found here, but since there is Edulis I suppose it may have been imported here also. I see aereus is also a choice edible, which is nice to know. My specimens do look very similar to aereus...

I have found another about 2 weeks ago that I also thought was boletus edulis, that was my first find of an edulis young enough to eat, that was at a different location to these 2 though. That one's cap was also slightly lighter that these 2...

I did just meet with one of the mycologists who wrote the 2012 paper about boletus edulis being in the Adelaide hills and he took half of each of my specimens for microscopy so I am very keen to hear from him again with his thoughts.

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Just a follow up on my find of Boletus edulis;

The mycologist has just gotten back to me and confirmed he believes my 2 fruit bodies to be Edulis, he said that Aereus has never been recorded to be found in Australia and he does not believe my finds to be Aereus. My find also fell outside of the previously documented range of boletus edulis in the Adelaide hills which is the whole reason I contacted the mycologist and thought my find may have been worthy of note.

Gotta say, I'm pretty damn happy with this outcome!

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B.aereus is better than edulis as it has more tight flesh than edulis.

Looks very aereus, but its also youngish...

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I found this lovely Terana caerulea on a recent rainforest walk. Apparently its common names are "cobalt crust" and "blue velvet on a stick", lol. I like the older classification - Pulcherricium caerulea, from the Latin pulcher meaning "beautiful". "Beautiful Blue" does seem to be a fitting name.

attachicon.gifTerana_caerulea2.jpg

attachicon.gifTerana_caerulea1.jpg

I keep coming back to these images. I would give an arm and a leg to find this on one of my hunts!

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Alright, just because you listed it as your favourite fungus Singult... : lol:

If you're interested in trying to cultivate it, I could send you a little piece to try. A finger-sized twig had fallen off that tree, which I brought home and planted in some moss. It's still alive, but not exactly thriving. I'm a bit lacking in mad fungus-cultivating skillz (not to mention the agar plates and all that jazz). The piece I've got did manage to colonise a (different kind of) neighbouring twig, so I doubt substrate is that important, but I can probably get an ID on that tree in the photo if you think it might help. I don't know about cultivating fungi so I don't know if you'll be able to get it going just from a little piece, but if you think it's doable and want to try, I'll send you a bit.

Edited by Anodyne
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These two looked quite pretty this morning

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Alright, just because you listed it as your favourite fungus Singult... : lol:

If you're interested in trying to cultivate it, I could send you a little piece to try. A finger-sized twig had fallen off that tree, which I brought home and planted in some moss. It's still alive, but not exactly thriving. I'm a bit lacking in mad fungus-cultivating skillz (not to mention the agar plates and all that jazz). The piece I've got did manage to colonise a (different kind of) neighbouring twig, so I doubt substrate is that important, but I can probably get an ID on that tree in the photo if you think it might help. I don't know about cultivating fungi so I don't know if you'll be able to get it going just from a little piece, but if you think it's doable and want to try, I'll send you a bit.

If you can identify the species of tree, would be great. Either way, PMing you.

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Here are some from recently:

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got this a few weeks back. I don't usually these this big here or I find them to late.

it was still hard as a rock. so I drop some on a agar plate, and ate the rest.

IMG 0859b

now it looks like this.

puffball on h2o2 agar

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these mushrooms have shown up here again, Chlorophyllum brunneum I believe.

spring I found 2. this autumn I have found a least 30. they appear just outside the laneway leading up to a dairy,

no more than a meter away.

Chlorophyllum brunneum6

they start of with a nice white cap with brown scales (sorry no pic at this stage).

then the back ground colour changes to a more brown.

as in these 2 pics, just a day apart.

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Chlorophyllum brunneum2

the colour of this back ground colour seems to correspond with spore load.
the whiter the cap the more the more spores the cap is dropping (have taken
prints at several stages). so the spore load seems to drop off long before the
it matures and flattens out. the print is white.

Chlorophyllum brunneum 3

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the ring (annulus) is attached and the stipe stains redish brown when cut.

if I have mist identified this mushroom, please let me know. this year is the first I have

come across this mushroom. there are some toxic in this group, hate to e wrong.

Edited by lindsay
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