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The Corroboree
Zen Peddler

Brown birch bolete 2013

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I tell you what folks - these guys taste soooo much better than slipperies... Id normally cut them but this bad boy was in a difficult spot and he came out. Solid fat arse of a thing and it smelled good to handle, smelled better when slicing, and smelled sensational when fried with bacon, butter, lemon rind and parsley. A friend who hates mushrooms even liked the smell.

Probably closer to porcini than anything else ive tried, but more earthy with a hint of Lepista nuda type waxy orange juice.

One thing ive noticed is that older specimens stink and have a foul kind of consistency. The first few I found were old where the cap had gone dark to black and they stand and had the consistency of rotten apple. The freshies are firm but they seem to only last a few days before they rot.

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Thought id post this fat bad boy because he is the freshest and fattest specimen ive found so far.

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Where was the hunting invite you SOB! lol

That looks freaking fantastic. Well done pal!

Did you happen to print him?

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Lovely! Where in the world did you find this baby?

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Up in the hills dude. Shroom up also from these forums knows the spot. As do MANY people including young couples who hold hands picking them with baskets. Seriously these are the tastiest shrooms that grow in Aussie I reckon.

Edited by Zen Peddler BlueGreenie

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Sorry for lack of invite dude. it was an impromptu thing as I wasn't expecting to find any and the other ones I found were all old and foul.

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I'd love to give these a good cook and eat. All I hear are good things.

Unfortunately, one of Melbourne's hunters who supplies restaurants knows about this spot. So he raids it.

Even though I don't know exactly where it is I know he knows. Killing me.

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Any more luck mate?

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just curious does anybody know if you can eat the boletus around sou west wa, I was looking into it and i think they are regius? if anybody could confirm this it would be great.. cheers buster.

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Not sure. Someone told me most Boletes are edible unless they stain funny or are red. But I wouldn't hold me to that! :)

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Awesome mate! I havent been in there for a look yet this year, I did see a bunch of oldies in there picking when I drove past so didnt bother looking on my way back past.

I know what you mean about the smell when theyre old aye, the smell almost choked me when I had a big whiff of one I was printing and forgot about.

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Buster, I've occasionally eaten native boletes that grow under River Redgum here in Nthn Vic.
They have reddish-brown cap, yellow pores, yellow flesh and show an instantaneous strong blue colouration when cut open.
the blue dissapears immediately when dropped into boiling water.
I don't really know what species it it (or if it has been classified) ,
but some of the locel Italian population have been eating them for years

generally with boletes, avoid ones with red pores.
I'm sure that's not the full storey though.

some are very bitter some have a slimey texture and/or are too bland to be worth bothering with.

Edited by gecko
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the blue dissapears immediately when dropped into boiling water.

I don't really know what species it it (or if it has been classified) ,

but some of the locel Italian population have been eating them for years

Interesting - is the boiling part of the preparation, or was this just a test? Could you provide any more info about the appearance of the mushrooms and how they are cooked/eaten? I have found a similar species in NSW, but have never been able to confirm edibility/toxicity - can't remember if I even managed to ID it for sure. Any more info would be appreciated.

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Yeah, slices of mushroom (the Boletus sp. mentioned above) dropped into boiling, salted water to which a a garlic clove has been added.

then thake them out after a few minutes, drain, pat dry, crumb and fry them.

that's the way I was told how to cook them.
don 't know if they're toxic at all, but I doubt it... most Boletes are edible if not bitter or have red pores.(generally speaking)
even Amanita muscaria is made edible by boiling first in enough water (discard the water),
so its probably a safer way to try them if not totally sure when arriving in a strange country
and finding mushrooms that look a bit like some of the ones from 'back home' in Italy.
If I find any I'll take some pics.

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^^^^^

Is it this one?

Thanks for the info gecko! If I find any of mine I'll post pics too, but as I recall they were a warm-weather species so it might be awhile.

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Amanita muscaria isn't toxic, but cooking it kills the hallucinogenic compound in them.

Some red boletes you can cook for 20 minutes and then eat them, they were european origin though.

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Amanita muscaria fatal dose is 15 caps. I would say this is fresh also. They are classified as toxic I would say.

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Does anyone know if Birch brown boletes grow in queensland? I am guessing not, but I didn't think I would find 5 different species of Slippery Jacks in queensland either but did.

Edited by Leaves

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I guess if you get birch trees? Ive found these below large stands of birch trees and at a place with one large old birch tree where there were a heap of these.

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