Jump to content
The Corroboree

Question

Hi All,

Found a large number of these (80 plus) of them.

Has anyone got any thoughts on drying them to prevent mould getting on them, for use in soups in winter? They were found around pines but in 'unusual' location on central coast nsw.

They are Slippery Jacks right?

Anyone found any CEPs lately they are willing to do a print trade on for Stropharia Wine Caps?

Room

post-8084-0-12379400-1367042616_thumb.jp

post-8084-0-17124000-1367042626_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Cap looks too dry for slipperies. Slipperies should have a slimey moist cap, and the pores dont look right to me.

I admit to not being 100% on Slippery identification, but that doesnt look like a slippery to me.

Ob.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Nice finds, Room, but no, those are not Slipperies. They are a native bolete species which happily grows in a mycorhizal relationship with introduced pines. I know a lot of people that make no distinction between them and Slipperies, and pick them for eating, so they're probably edible (or at least not toxic), albeit not as tasty and tender as Slippery Jacks (Suillus luteus/granulatus). My call is to ditch them and keep hunting. Slipperies can still pop up in huge numbers quite late in the season. The biggest haul I've ever had was from mid June, down in the Southern Highlands.

And it's not likely that anyone has cep prints here. Reports of Boletus edulis in Australia are limited to a dozen cases, if that. What's more, they're infamous for their reluctance to yield to the cultivator's attempts to grow them, so you'd have to be pretty skilled/lucky/blessed if that's what you're thinking!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

And it's not likely that anyone has cep prints here. Reports of Boletus edulis in Australia are limited to a dozen cases, if that. What's more, they're infamous for their reluctance to yield to the cultivator's attempts to grow them, so you'd have to be pretty skilled/lucky/blessed if that's what you're thinking!

Ceps are present in aus, with most reported cases in SA. Apparently they are spreading quickly tho, and many people are trying to set up patches, how successuly i dont know.

Im another one of those keen to cultivate these, but also well aware of the potential risks to the environment. tricky one!

Cheers, Ob.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

They're Suillus sp. for sure (98% sure that is), but just old dry ones.

too old for eating

-S.luteus if annulus (ring on stem) remnant is present,

-S.granulatus if not ring remnant

habitat is right (Pinus sp.)

pores look right for old specemins (enlarged pores and darkened)

cap looks right for old ones (dry and wrinkled)

mycelium looks typical of Suillus sp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×