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mindperformer

Trichocereus bridgesii, Ariocarpus fissuratus and Peyote- impressions

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likely Trichocereus cuzcoensis KK242 (previously named as Trichocereus bridgesii):

2e34qba.jpg

Ariocarpus fissuratus:

vphw0x.jpg

Lophophora williamsii:

n63olf.jpg

Edited by mindperformer

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The one labeled T. bridgesii looks more like a healthy seed-grown cuzco to me.

1 Developed spines in the picture are darker at the base and broaden at the aerole. Bridge typically have spines that are lighter at the base and darken at the tip, and do not broaden at the aerole.

2 The pictured trich has one or two long central spines with much shorter radial spines (6 to 9 or so total?). Bridge have fewer spines (3-5) and tend to be splayed out equally as opposed to an orderly central and radial distribution.

3 The ribs are knobbier around the areole of the mystery trich, whereas the bridge seem smoother.

Heres a comparison shot, the cuzco was sold as a peruvianus (although some say the cuzco is a type of peruvianus), and the bridgesii was grown from cactusplaza seed, and was the most "typical" looking bridge of the batch.

I don't know shit about ariocarpus, but that Lopho sure is a beauty! :wub:

post-9455-0-17163200-1349200736_thumb.jp

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Yeah thats Cuzcoensis KK242. But very nice Loph! I like that type. bye Eg

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Thanks for identifying, I got it from Uhlig and didn't check the morphology precisely, until now... you are absolutely right

Uhlig: http://www.uhlig-kakteen.de/header.php

it was years ago and I don't know if they have the real T. bridgesii now because they added no foto...

Edited by mindperformer

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Pachycereus pecten-aboriginum:

qnv0g2.jpg

Pachycereus pringlei:

50kwtz.jpg

Pelecyphora pseudopectinata:

mm8zv8.jpg

Mammilaria sp. (formerly named as M. heyderi):

ip3vpd.jpg

Aizoaceae:

Pleiospilus bolusii:

2v2ejqu.jpg

2mhd1ue.jpg

Lapidaria, Lithops and Fenestraria:

34oer01.jpg

Hoodia gordonii and Sceletium tortuosum:

f20xs5.jpg

Edited by mindperformer
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Totally LOVE Lithops! They are my new passion! Have shitloads of them on my sowing out schedule for the next season.

Btw, i like your labels with the INHALTSSTOFFE and such. ;)

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...not sure with that identity, now after comparison I think it is possibly a M. wildii, what do you think?

I'm not very specialized on cacti...

Edited by mindperformer

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I'm not very specialized on cacti...

finally, something the SAB community may teach mindperformer :) my guess would be mammilaria bombycina, hope that helps :)

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I also thought on M. bombycina, but for me it looks much more hairy and the spines are white at their base

Edited by mindperformer

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i think mammilaria wildii to have mostly white hooked central spines. it seems to me the spination of your cactus is within the variable limits for bombycina, taking also into account environmental factors (your plant does look to have had a reasonably rough time somewhere in its life). i believe in part or full shade this species spines less densely :)

edit: i would much like to here someone more informed's opinion, EG?

Edited by dionysus

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edit: i would much like to here someone more informed's opinion, EG?

Just enjoying a perfect music-listening day but will have a look later when im done rocking. :wink: But i guess snowfella knows Mammillarias better than i do so i wouldnt be surprised if he came up with the right answer already. Its very likely its leucantha but its a bit difficult to say as the plants sun-patches influence the general appearance a bit. Mammillaria Guelzowiana is another option but i guess the hair is not dense enough for that. I think i would tend to leucantha too as it is one of the more common ones. Im sure we can give you a definite answer next time it shows its flower/seed pods. bye Eg

Edited by Evil Genius

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yes, M. leucantha seems to be the most plausible, thanks for identification :worship:

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Coryphanta macromeris var. runyonii (macromerine...):

97v43k.jpg

Trichocereus terscheckii, a young one:

29ftf0l.jpg

Gymnocalycium gibbosum:

2rmtrgw.jpg

Edited by mindperformer

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Very nice pics, Mindperformer. Please leave info about mescaline and potency out as we´re moderating this kind of stuff here to keep them from being banned. Thanks. bye Eg

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no problem, I edited now... n o mescaline-mentions anymore...

as far as I know macromerine is not illegal in any part of the world...

Edited by mindperformer

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Can't say I know them well as I've only collected for a year or so but I tend to go all OCD on a new hobby and read/google like crazy! Reason I think i know that mamm is because I had one just like it before killing it last fall from rot.

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Mamms are very sensitive on overwatering

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Some microscopic fotos:

Aztekium ritteri- seed, 24-fold:

t5r7lt.jpg

Pelecyphora aselliformis- wart, 24-fold:

w7bek8.jpg

Lophophora williamsii- seed, 24-fold:

4u9ith.jpg

Lophophora williamsii- seed, 55-fold:

ms24cg.jpg

Edited by mindperformer
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