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Melange

New to cultivation & mycology, where to start?

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I believe it was agaricus bisporus that grew from a kit I bought at Bunnings, it made only a very faint spore print (though the mushroom itself was huge). Only a few mushrooms grew in that kit, and some green mould popped up, so I wasn't sure what might have grown on the agar. It was to practice working with agar, though I'll see if it can get going in a grain jar.

I'll have a look in big W for some of those small containers, I've got the urge to see how many types of mould and bacteria are infesting my place at the moment so I'll need a lot of dishes to work with! Thanks for the help, I'll let you know how the growing goes.

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Well that didn't work out as planned ! I'm keen on pursuing the 'no-pour' agar tek, where the media is prepared and transferred to containers before pressure cooking, to reduce one instance of contamination (considerations are made for not having a flowhood). This is working for me with 1/2 pint jars, but the vacuum seal makes it tough to pry the metal lids off. After trying the little sauce containers, fully sealed, I just inspected then post-autoclaving, and the lids all popped off.

I'll try something else this afternoon. Two option I have in my mind are:

1. Leaving the lids ajar, and wrapping the jars in foil before going into the PC, then snapping them on after sterilising. My concern though is that the lids have bowed slighty and are a challenge to get back on now. Furthermore, I may as well pour sterile agar if Im mucking around post-PC'ing.

2. Installing an Air-Port, by using high temp RTV gasket silicone, piercing the lid with a needle, stuffing the needle attachment with polyfill, and covering with foil. This may also promote faster growth, with an air exchange vector.

Any suggestions from the experts? These are the containers:

9357237551134.jpg

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I've used the same containers previously, and had no dramas vis-a-vis contamination. I think the trick is to get 'em whilst they are still hot.

For my money, small jars (like baby food jars) are the best bet.

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Another random tip.. I used to spend ages inside the kitchen making a mess when rinsing my Wild Bird Seed.

Now I just dump it all into a large bucket (painter's pail), and take it outside.. I then hit it with a hose. Once the bucket gets around half full, I drain the water and repeat.

The pressure of the hose doesn't seem to damage the grains, and the pressure really helps clean the seed. It takes me around 5 minutes now to rinse my WBS to the point where

the water is clear. Before, I'd be spending at least 20 minutes rinsing in the kitchen and making a huge mess.

You don't have to bother skimming off floaters either (if you're into that -- it doesn't really matter, so I've heard). When you fill the bucket with water and agitate the seed around with the pressure, all the crap

comes to the surface and easily pours out.

I then come back inside to a pot of hot water that's been heating while I was outside rinsing, and dump it into the bucket, and pop on the lid for a 24hour soak.

Edited by SYNeR

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^good method SYNeR, 20 L bucket and final rinse off with a big colander for me. If I doing 25 kg + its a garbage bin with holes drilled in it about a third of the way up . I generally do my myc in big intensive runs due to climate, and dry out most of the fruit (that is suitable) for storage and rehydrate when I want to cook with them.

get the "floaters" and broken grains out or you'll increase your chance of having issues with greasy spot - which is bacteria growth.Being bacteria forming resistant endospores they are of the hardest contams to kill off.

The main reason to soak grains first is to get these endospores to spring to life and greatly reduce the contam load of spores, hopefully you germinate them all and kill the bacto in the PC.

I found wheat to be the biggest issue with with bacterial contams. Not sure why - maybe a better host, could be storage practices.

Greasy spot was the biggest issue I use to regularly get, still hits me now and again but I find it easy to spot in jars now, gets a bit more advanced in bags.

They just love broken big grains. I'm into it :wink:

Edited to make sense ...lol

Edited by waterboy
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Does anyone bother rinsing after simmering?

I have been, but it's rather annoying. I do a final rinse with hot water so when I dry the WBS, steam evaporates off. The problem is, I live in an older house and we've been having problems with plumbing

and the hot water turning a murky colour.. so I haven't been game to use it.

As a result, I've been having to heat up water on the stove or in the kettle and rinse this way -- but it's quite tedious. I'm wondering if it's worth skipping the rinse after simmering. I suppose it depends if there's

any slimy residue on the seeds?

Also, does anyone have any good recommendations for a food dehydrator? Something that works okay but isn't stupidly expensive.

I was looking at an EziDry Snackmaker... 5 trays expandable to 15.

Also keen to use it for making my own dried fruits, etc

Edited by SYNeR

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re dehydrator - I have abused my ezidri for a few years now.lasted longer than others I've had. Hardly Normal (Harvey Norman) where I found mne, would find one cheaper some where else no doubt. 5 trays standard, but I,ve run a tower of 14 trays (and a few spacers) and its worked.

Mine will get weeks of nearly 24 hr service just from the fruit and veg patch alone again this year. Been doing loads of shiitake right now that the family cannot consume fresh.

Not sure what I payed now, but if it dies tomorrow I will pay whatever again for the base model. I got extra trays and spacers off ebay.

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If one were keeping all the extra edible mushrooms for future ingredients, how would it go blending them down, spreading the paste on some overn tray and drying in direct sunlight for a couple of days, then powdering the stuff, and vacuum sealing so it's available for soups & stews in the off season?

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re dehydrator - I have abused my ezidri for a few years now.lasted longer than others I've had. Hardly Normal (Harvey Norman) where I found mne, would find one cheaper some where else no doubt. 5 trays standard, but I,ve run a tower of 14 trays (and a few spacers) and its worked.

Mine will get weeks of nearly 24 hr service just from the fruit and veg patch alone again this year. Been doing loads of shiitake right now that the family cannot consume fresh.

Not sure what I payed now, but if it dies tomorrow I will pay whatever again for the base model. I got extra trays and spacers off ebay.

Thanks for the review :)

I'll definitely get one.. They seem to be a reasonable price. It's either that, or get a cheap Sunbeam dehydrator, and I've read mixed reviews.. Or, fork out $300-400+ for an Excalibur.

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another good tip is to steam dry i soak in water for 24 then boil for ten min then drain and spread out hot the steam is excess water

coming out of the grain. on the topic i hate wbs i never had any luck with it i use barley grain its about the same price and contemplating

adding poppy seeds so to give it more inoculation points . thanks psylo i think all of us together we make a wealth of information

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