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Stillman

Trichocereus cuzcoensis

Question

Heres a couple plants that I have growing out I guess they are T cuzcoensis from spination but I really can't tell? I think it will become more apparent as they get bigger. The 3 in question are all from Hamiltons nursery the first one is a cutting the second two are seed grown (by them). Any opinions.

Hamiltons 1

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Hamiltons 2

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Hamiltons 3

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And to throw a spanner in the works This is grafted seedling that I grew J3 open pollinated.

How do you definitively identify cuzco because I don't have a clue lol ?

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hard to tell with seedlings as they mature over time.

maybe the first is cuzco

and the last two are peru?

nice plants either way

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Those plants are so awesome.. Look at those golden spines and green skin! :drool2:

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Not sure about your seedlings, as most tricho seedlings look quite similar.

However a couple traits distinguishing the cuzco from peru (at least IME):

1) broadening of the spine at the base on fully developed spines

2) dark colored base of the spine with lighter mid and tip sections on fully developed spines

3) wavy margin between the ribs (more clearly visible when older)

That said, some vendors consider the cuzco a type of peru, so they share a lot of similar traits as well.

Based on these criteria, I would say the first and second pics show at least two cuzco traits, the other pics seem peru to me.

My cuzco grows incredibly fast and is a very hearty rootstock! These babies look nice and health, good work!

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cuzco ribs look like a + sign if you look at them from bird's eye view....

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The Hamiltons 3 plant is my favourite of that batch. Red spines and gonna be a real tank of a plant. I actually contacted Hamiltons and enquired if they are producing there own seed or if they are buying it in, also asked if they had a pic of any mother planst they may have. Not sure if they will get back to me but worth a shot.

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By the way hamiltons 2 and 3 are plants I bought from bunnings in those tiny pots with the googly eyes.

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Hamiltons got back to me and said they buy from a commercial supplier as T peruvianus no pics of adult plants unfortunately.

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cuzco ribs look like a + sign if you look at them from bird's eye view....

Is that confirmed?

And if so, that would mean none of the plants presented by Stillman are cuzco's, am I right?

Edited by Quixote

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hammiltons 2 looks like cuzco alright, specially the top view

the rest, I am not so sure, let them grow a bit. there might be a macro or peruv in those, no doubt.

Wait.

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cuzco ribs look like a + sign if you look at them from bird's eye view....

There are some types of cuzcoensis this definately applies to. KK242 for example looks a lot like a + from birds view. But there also are many other types that dont show that feature so you cant make a general rule out of it. But its actually better than nothing for people who have difficulties keeping them apart.

Edited by Evil Genius

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Correct me if I'm wrong... but wouldn't cactus in question have to have 8 ribs to look like a plus sign when viewed from overhead?

Some of my cuzcos (one was sold as KK242 but who knows really!) have 6 and 7 ribs, so they don't look like a plus when viewed from above.

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Yeah its not actually a real plus in many cases because of the fluctuation in rib count but i guess i know what he´s trying to say. The Rib shape on many Cuzcoensis is a lot more sharp edged than in some other San Pedros and in combination with the defined structure of the ribs, it can look like a plus sign sometimes. But its far from being reliable.

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Thanks for clarifying! I'll have to take some overhead pics of my trichs to checkout their differences rib structure side by side :wink:

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Really great pereskiopsis graft! where can i find quality easy to follow info on how to succeed at that? im ready to graft about 20 Tricho seedlings !

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watertrade has a video or youtube. Most important thing is sharp scalpels and a humidity chamber.

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check out this thread... http://www.shaman-australis.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=31705

*NOTE the thing with peres is the scions used are generally VERY small, young and easy to 'crush', to the MAJOR thing is to ensure you "DRAG or SLIDE" and NOT "PUSH or CRUSH" the blade through the scion. I slowly slide from one side of the blade through until i feel it very slightly cutting into my finger.

I have ALWAYS sterilized my tools, and attribute the 3 failures to the hygiene of the environment or tools, as i have had the same species that failed, also succeed.

I clean the blade, cut the peres, then cut a tiny piece to sit on top without cleaning in between, then clean, then cut scion, remove top piece of pereskopsis, sit scion off-centered on top and apply minimal downward pressure whilst making the union.

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Most important thing is sharp scalpels and a humidity chamber.

yeah a proper knife is essential.

humidity chamber is not really so important [especially since I dont bother with sterilisation of tools and stuff,

but it really depends on how dry is the climate. for me a shady place with no drafts of air works fine.

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to me, doesn't have the notches, but also isn't as amber spine as the actives?

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Heres an update of plant 1 its growing really fast and has thrown a pup too. I'm thinking still Cuzco sorry the pics have dodgy light.

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