Jump to content
The Corroboree
mindperformer

Acacia acuminata

Recommended Posts

Acacia acuminata spooks around the ethnobotanical community in recent years. It's natural habitat is very restricted, depending on the variation and form, and there are many of it, which can be distinguished only by experienced botanists. The habitat is the geologically the oldest on earth, there were found the oldest rocks and fossils (stromatolites). Some variations contain potential toxic alkaloids like MTHBC, 2-MTHBC and THBC.

Unfortunately because of predicted DMT-contents (only few hardly distinguishable subspecies) there has been a careless depletion of the trees in nature. They can get very old and are standing on the oldest ground on earth, so it is absolutely unethical and disrespectful, not to say an asshole-action to destroy this trees. I think anyone who does this will have a very bad karma and will get badly intoxicated from the extracts.

Anyone who wants to breed this plant for conservation of the species should not buy cuttings. There are vendors, selling seeds which are easy to germinate.

I got the small seed-variant via ebay (they were sent from Australia to Austria within one week ;-)

The seedlings which thrive very well now (after scarification of the seeds with sandpaper and 300ppm GA3):

2njj56s.jpg

Edited by mindperformer
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already decided to modify my last post about this plant to this, but when I came back from dog-walk, the last post was deleted without comment...

I hope this will not be deleted, because there is no reason anymore.

It should be noted that, in the case it's deleted again, I will delete all my topics and don't utter another word.

Edited by mindperformer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Acacia acuminata spooks around the ethnobotanical community in recent years. It's natural habitat is very restricted, depending on the variation and form, and there are many of it, which can be distinguished only by experienced botanists. The habitat is the geologically the oldest on earth, there were found the oldest rocks and fossils (stromatolites). Some variations contain potential toxic alkaloids like MTHBC, 2-MTHBC and THBC.

Unfortunately because of predicted DMT-contents (only few hardly distinguishable subspecies) there has been a careless depletion of the trees in nature. They can get very old and are standing on the oldest ground on earth, so it is absolutely unethical and disrespectful, not to say an asshole-action to destroy this trees. I think anyone who does this will have a very bad karma and will get badly intoxicated from the extracts.

Anyone who wants to breed this plant for conservation of the species should not buy cuttings. There are vendors, selling seeds which are easy to germinate.

I got the small seed-variant via ebay (they were sent from Australia to Austria within one week ;-)

The seedlings which thrive very well now (after scarification of the seeds with sandpaper and 300ppm GA3):

a>

I already decided to modify my last post about this plant to this, but when I came back from dog-walk, the last post was deleted without comment...

I hope this will not be deleted, because there is no reason anymore.

It should be noted that, in the case it's deleted again, I will delete all my topics and don't utter another word.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got the comments today and I already agreed with the reason. The point was that I've already decided to modify my last post, but before I could do it: deletion... however...it's ok now

There was no rule-breaking but: I agreed, it was too promoting for this endangered plant. This was a problem because of disrespectful people who damage it in nature, so I made a new anti-promoting post.

I think it's ok to buy seeds from this species because they are collected without making damage to the trees. Only a very small percentage of the many seeds simply falling down from the tree can germinate in the desert-habitat. Buyers of the seed should also appeal to the sellers to bury some seeds in the habitat, to help the plant spreading.

Edited by mindperformer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually don't think there is too much too worry about from a pure conservation perspective; the species is widespread, abundant, and continually being planted in roadside revegetation and landcare programs. You're right, there is no problem in buying and selling seeds.

However

I do appreciate your concern Mindperformer.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its obtusifolia that's in real trouble in the wild, thanks to careless attitudes and greed down under.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>Its obtusifolia that's in real trouble in the wild,

what are you basing this information upon?

Obutsifolia is an extremely common tree. There are places where loggers are cutting down as many in a day as any tryptamine harvesters could possibly harvest in a year. And still, there are places where this tree is thriving, and many of these places it is really hard for humans to go to. The biggest threat to obtusifolia is fire, but paradoxically, this also brings them to sprout anew.

Julian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The distribution of Acacia obtusifolia:

http://www.google.at...29,r:5,s:0,i:84

One of the most endangered species of the genus is Acacia phlebophylla, The Mount Buffalo Wattle:

The distribution:

http://www.google.at/imgres?q=acacia+phlebophylla+distribution&um=1&hl=de&biw=1527&bih=823&tbm=isch&tbnid=Zwt8ns4vS5qfIM:&imgrefurl=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Acacia-phlebophylla-range-map.png&imgurl=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Acacia-phlebophylla-range-map.png&w=314&h=284&ei=NTA9UKSNAcWLswadqoDIBQ&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=188&vpy=150&dur=979&hovh=213&hovw=237&tx=85&ty=69&sig=118135100028376239608&page=1&tbnh=156&tbnw=172&start=0&ndsp=30&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:69

Acacia phlebophylla- leaves (collected fallen off leaves, not picked):

24bu6fl.jpg

Acacia phlebophylla- leaf 24-fold:

34hyrgp.jpg

Acacia phlebophylla- seed 24-fold:

2mms586.jpg

and a small seedling:

5md7jc.jpg

Edited by mindperformer
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

folias wrote:

Obutsifolia is an extremely common tree. There are places where loggers are cutting down as many in a day as any tryptamine harvesters could possibly harvest in a year. And still, there are places where this tree is thriving, and many of these places it is really hard for humans to go to. The biggest threat to obtusifolia is fire, but paradoxically, this also brings them to sprout anew.

..basically bullshit..almost every national park has severe damage to all mature adult trees..there aren't that many state forests..

i will now go after you..i mean it tree killer!

ps. phlebophylla is estimated 15-20,000 trees in THREE locations..the most endangered is CENSORED!

Edited by phyllode

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol at myself in a panic in the wee small hours of sunday morning downloading mindperformers threads after seeing this one and planthelper thinks to just quote the threads........apparently my internetting needs a lot of practice

thanks mindperformer for the awesome info and photos and thanks planthelper for the internet schooling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol at myself in a panic in the wee small hours of sunday morning downloading mindperformers threads after seeing this one and planthelper thinks to just quote the threads........apparently my internetting needs a lot of practice

thanks mindperformer for the awesome info and photos and thanks planthelper for the internet schooling

do you know why i just quoted those topics?

my guess is no.

i don't understand what you try to say about me quoting this info????

mp threatend us to delete all his posts, quoting is the only sure way to save them.

deleting your own posts, because the poster is upset, is seen as a not very kind action.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thats what he was saying PH, he spent ages saving all of MPs posts into his personal offline refference archives, acknowledging their value, where you had the wisdom just to quote them into your own posts :P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thx dionysus!

i thought he's vesicious (spell?).

it's all good for me, let's hope eatingsand is not pissed off now.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there's much confusion...

Sorry for my extremely reaction (to the deleting of my post before I could change it). As I already wrote I was upset, but there is no reason anymore to delete all my posts (this would have been a reaction if this post would have been deleted). The case was resolved with the admins and there is no problem anymore.

Edited by mindperformer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>..basically bullshit..almost every national park has severe damage to all mature adult trees..

you mean people have been damaging *all* mature trees? like taking bits of bark off them? I've only heard of that in Victoria, with the stand of trees considered a "weed"

what I've seen is at well known places, I mean really touristy places, are some real idiots hacking away at trees and leaving behind a real mess. but still, there are many other trees in these locations.

so you've been walking around these national parks recently and checking this out? this is news to me. I hear some hype about this, but it mostly comes from one person and I'm not sure if it is accurate as it just seems like overblown disinformation designed to get people worked up.

I did some recon work almost 10 years ago and concluded obutsifolia was very prevalent! I doubt harvesters could really dent the population more than wind, fire, thunderstorms and loggers, which is how most trees die. a lot of harvesters only take fallen trees too after thunderstorms. plus, a lot of these trees are in places where humans cannot easily get to.

and hey, just because I am questioning your perspectives here and trying to communicate some of my own, doesn't mean I deserve to be threatened and accused. I would only condone the cutting down of trees when they are at the very end of their lifespan, basically about to fall over. Better to go with ones that are already fallen over, which is really common in some areas. better yet, grow your own, which is what many people are doing thankfully.

Julian.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its only one example but theres a national park spitting distance from where i live and i visit most days and there are heaps of obtusifolia and a few phlebb. but they are all babies i have yet to find one taller than chest -high. wondering if these species have trouble growing to full maturity or if I am maybe not venturing far enough off the beaten path...If it is true about the relatively high content of psychoactive alkaloids in the phyllodes of other acacia species (floribunda maybe???) wouldnt it be wise of a community like this to get that info out and about as much as possible and maybe slow down the de-barking thats happening (if it is rampant)

.......but i think this has already been discussed on another thread and I think there is some argument about the reported content of phyllodes

......and PH I was complimenting your internenettining skills and I dont know what vesicious means :scratchhead:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

increasing availability of info to stop over harvesting is 1 thing, but i think people should consider resisting the indignity of assuming you can speak or act on behalf of something which you don't fully understand before judging others.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>wondering if these species have trouble growing to full maturity or if I am maybe not venturing far enough off the beaten path...I

you need to go deep into the forrest and most national parks have limited paths, so many of these trees are just not easily accesible to human beings.

>wouldnt it be wise of a community like this to get that info out and about as much as possible and maybe slow down the de-barking thats happening (if it is rampant)

I think its a myth it is rampant. Every now and then there are random reports of someone seeing whole areas completely decimated by harvesters. I've never seen such a thing and I don't know anyone else who has seen such a thing. I am only aware of one person who says this, and he is extremely protective of this species!

Maybe he saw something many years ago. I don't know. But generally, it is fires that kill the trees so that mature trees are not as common as young uns. But that goes for all acacia species. I mean, I've never been able to find really mature specimens of Acacia longissima, not due to anyone harvesting them but due to fires and the species is not that common.

I know one area known to a lot of people, where acacias are a pioneer species, and have been usurped by other species, and most all of the mature obtusifolias have just lived out their life span and fallen over! I've seen people just leaving logs they chainsawed on the path there, but obviously they were not interested in most of these trees! As the bark is just rotted on so many dead ones.

one big tree is enough to supply the tribe and most other tribes in the surrounding area for a year. if people were razing whole areas I am not sure where it would actually go!

It is not like acacia harvesting is a massive industry with big global demand. in the eu or u.s. people normally either make it themselves or buy it dirt cheap from entrepreneurial brazilians. I'm in the eu now, and every now and then you hear of people who got some dmt from australia, maybe some waxy red stuff. but yeah, I think some people have some illusions about this story. and also, I think the people doing it are generally a conscious and conscientious bunch, with exceptions of course, and with the level of secrecy and associated BS involved in the underground, it is hard or impossible to know what is really going on overall.

Years ago, I met this biker dude (through an eb conference) who told he was stripping longifolia bark off trees off mature trees on a mates property and making DMT for the biker community! the guy didn't seem to have too much concern about how he was killing all these trees, and I heard he ended up in jail shortly after for some other thing (karma?) and that is the big, underestimated element, powerful plants have powerful allies. you just don't fuck with them and every now and then I hear these stories of people going acropper after doing wrong by the trees.

but yeah, I know of places where there are mature acacias as far as the eye can see. I doubt even the most rampant harvesters could really make a dint into those places, as loggers are already chopping away in these areas anyway!

Julian.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"powerful plants have powerful allies" Love that line so so much folias, and so true

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't say anything to the actual status of (possibly endangered) australian acacias, because I've never been in Australia and Austria is so far away, that I don't know any reports about this issue heard straight from the horse's mouth. I only know what I've read and there is much controversy... so I'll stay out of this discussion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am going to reserve whats left of my dignity thankyou bullsonparade and chime out also, please excuse my ignorance

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
but yeah, I know of places where there are mature acacias as far as the eye can see. I doubt even the most rampant harvesters could really make a dint into those places, as loggers are already chopping away in these areas anyway!

Julian.


On behalf of people with more experience than you with these trees, i think you should be ashamed.

Many in the community here know just exploitive you are.

If you actually cared about these plants you'd have some ecological sanity. The Blue Mountains. The North Coast. Decimated, no doubt by people like you.

How about leaving what's left alone and growing some you lazy bastard. Too impatient eh? Too much on your agenda?

I really am coming after you (legally, of course)

Edited by phyllode

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×