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Barefootpicker

SE QLD private plant detective

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I work in the bush everyday doing regen and reveg and I come across alot of interesting plants that im sure you guys would love. Im still a bit novice compared to some in the whole plant id area. To make my learning a bit more fun and interesting I would love if you guys gave me a few objectives such as naming some rare or much wanted plants for me to find. My goal will be to collect you photos, seeds, leaf presses ect...

So please name some plants that will be fun to track down and also give reasons why you chose this particular one.

I am mainly around the gold coast from the beach to the hinterland.

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Hmm, sounds like fun/interesting. I will get back to you on that one. Welcome to SAB Barefootpicker.

:)

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that sounds like a cool idea you have a lot of interesting plants where you are

edit* first suggestion could you can find a eucalypt whose wood density gradient is higher than water..sinking wood..(there is at least 1 that i know of).. why is ultimate acoustic resonance.. didj material..

welcome!

Edited by bulls on parade
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WELCOME!!!!! We need more of us in SE QLD

Firstly, to answer your question, keep an eye out for

Erythroxylum australe

It's kinda interesting.

Oh and do me a favour, If you spot Aristolochia meridionalis, let me know, my superiors are doing some research on it as being a possible keystone species to gene flow between populations of the Richmond Birdwing Butterfly.

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i'd like to see any wildlife you manage to photograph. i'm always finding new insects in brisbane. i wonder what's buzzing around down the coast.

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Ok ill start draging some branches down to the creek ;)

And sounds like a good first objective Halcyon my mission starts Tuesday

Edited by Barefootpicker

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Hey Halcyon Daze I have a heap of Bird wing vine growing in my back yard (.Pararistolochia praevenosa) they has been flowering this year but no seeds or fruit. Or Bird wings for that matter but some Big Greasys and shit.

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Hey Halcyon Daze I have a heap of Bird wing vine growing in my back yard (.Pararistolochia praevenosa) they has been flowering this year but no seeds or fruit. Or Bird wings for that matter but some Big Greasys and shit.

Cool, you should join the RBCN Richmond Birdwing Conservation Network. You might be able to help them establish an important corridore in your area. It's a government sponsored organisation now and heaps of cool things are happening. including breeding pograms to overcome inbreeding depression.

http://www.richmondbirdwing.org.au/

P. praevenosa is a protected species in QLD but not NSW. It is technically illegal to propagate it without a permit, not that anyone in the club agrees with these restrictions. I have a few ripe pods on my vines at the moment that I don't know what to do with lol.

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yeah I heard you need a permit to propagate it. Bizarre lol

I am Between the Deagon Wetlands and the Boondal wetlands

I have actually discussed this with local council. What we need is a Richmond Birdwing siting in our area then they would go for what I proposed.

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Yo barefoot - see if you can find Isoglossa eranthemoides or Senna acclinis in the Gold Coast hinterland.

Good luck!!!

And Halcyon I think the local Erythroxylum might now be E. sp (Splityard Creek)... possibly not E. australe

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There's a rather unique Argyreia spp - native I guess - on Burleigh Heads I noted while doing geological/biologica/physical survey of area for Uni. '83 (by sextant, map, compass, troglodyte, and a load of other stuff you don't need now!)

Glory Be! NOW i can give you gps - for gmap and you can see it yourself! (Saves my old legs the walk!)

Best of luck! Haven't worn shoes myself for 10 years (except at Wandjina Gardens when Pommy Paul insisted I put them on around the cactii - "I can walk across fire!" - I protested - he wouldn't listen...)

Your "black soled" mate, Pat.

PS - If it is a new Argyreia can I name it Argyreia pissoffpaul?

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There's a rather unique Argyreia spp - native I guess - on Burleigh Heads I noted while doing geological/biologica/physical survey of area for Uni. '83 (by sextant, map, compass, troglodyte, and a load of other stuff you don't need now!)

Glory Be! NOW i can give you gps - for gmap and you can see it yourself! (Saves my old legs the walk!)

Best of luck! Haven't worn shoes myself for 10 years (except at Wandjina Gardens when Pommy Paul insisted I put them on around the cactii - "I can walk across fire!" - I protested - he wouldn't listen...)

Your "black soled" mate, Pat.

PS - If it is a new Argyreia can I name it Argyreia pissoffpaul?

It was the redbacks mate, they were like hell in there. One under every pot :wink:

A. pissoffpaulii? Has quite a ring to it I reckon!

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welcome...

im not sure what the laws are like over there but here in WA it is illigal to collect native seeds unless you have a licence.

But i would love to see any and all pictures you capture of animals and plants or even just nice sceneries xD

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Welcome to SAB, woot another SE-QLDer!!

Cinnamonum camphora is a unique tree that you will be able to identify easy, great tree to learn to ID, practicaly a weed so you wont have a hard time finding it at the Gold Coast, many, MANY, MANY uses in herbal medicine, contains interesting oils, and has a very interesting ethnobotanical history all around the world.

Schinus terebinthifoius a nother easy to ID unique tree that is also a weed so you will have no trouble finding it, this tree is underrated and has many uses including a large ethnobotanical history, not a true pepper (piper) but the pink seeds are marketed as "pink pepper corns".

Both above are enviromental weeds so take care of seeds collected and make sure not to spread. Not RARE, but its a start...

....@pat, lol GPS makes storing the location of tresure alot easyer ;), a "SAB in the WILD" GPS members map would be a interesting idea, i can map out all the acacia groves and bark piles i know around the area.... interesting idea i like it.

Edited by vual

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i can map out all the acacia groves and bark piles i know around the area.... interesting idea i like it.

if you want i can dig around and find photos taken by a friend of a well known acacia 'spot' in the blue mountains, turned into a graveyard..giving specific locations is bad idea imo

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if you want i can dig around and find photos taken by a friend of a well known acacia 'spot' in the blue mountains, turned into a graveyard..giving specific locations is bad idea imo

true good point, private invite membership only, touche.

Edited by vual

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I do rather like the idea of a "map" style database for SAB. The supreme example is:-

www.bonzle.com where you can look up a wealth of mining, etc. in your area. Great for quartz crystals'n'stuff - or you might get real lucky! That site has servers devoted to an enormous engine and well exceeds our requirements here! However.

But a low scale one, where things of our mutual interest, ethnobots!, can be marked. I'm thinking the Dubosia farms of Kilcoy, Ginger farm of Cooroy, etc. Other "must sees" like Gaydon's Victorian Pharmacy Museum at Childers (I'm writing a topic to post on this place! - it's priceless!)

Good for marking the ranges of common but useful species where they're so abundant a 'first timer' could spot them.

It'd be great if you're planning a tour that way and can include really cosmic, recommended zoney places (full of mana!)

Certainly if you're coming my way, I could mark a few spots where I'll be happy to "leave a little something for you" to pick up on the way past. Ain't GPS and instant communication a great thing!

You reckon google would make a big thing if we discovered a species using their resources? Chip in a bit for map style database?

Here's that A. - While researching as fast a we could to get the National Park full protection (Local politicians wanted to build a casino there!) I was recording the orientation of basalt columns on the north side when I saw what looked to be Ipomea congesta scraggling off the cliff. Encouraged that it had visible seed pods, wasn't pestilent Ipomea I got closer to see it had the classic "silver leaf" that defines the Genus. The capsules were perfect, twisted rose buds in shape - unlike HBWR which looks more like "the god of many little heads" than does Rivea. Can't miss those purple 'bell' flowers. (Oh - it got NP status, and Russ Hinze got the arse!)

Try http://maps.google.com.au/maps?rlz=1C1SKPH_enAU394&ix=aca&q=gmap&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&sa=N&tab=wl

to orientate yourself. I'll double check me notes for exact GPS. It's been there since Gondwanaland - checked it again 5 years later, still there - hopefully still there now.

Don't you worry - get on with the rangers, they might help you - might even overlook a little sample getting stuck in your hair. Certainly if you're a student collecting for your "pressed flower collection" they might let you know when they're cutting back.

Can always trust a bare foot man - can't you? (Wear flowers in hair and rhinestone G string, stinking of Copenhagen aftershave and they'll think you're local)

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Sozz - folk - that link won't work. I'll try something else.

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Yo barefoot - see if you can find Isoglossa eranthemoides in the Gold Coast hinterland.

Good luck!!!

ahhh...the ever elusive endangered aboriginal herb.... ive spent hours looking for it around the Mt. Warning caldera to no avail yet!

also synonomous with Justicia eranthemoides....keep an eye out for this one in particular barefootpicker(BFP)

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Round Mt Warning the best place to look for Isoglossa is around Breakfast Creek- it is quite abundant there..

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yay!...finally some people who know a little about some of the rarer natives.....Thanks so much tarenna....i thought it occured at 600m mark, and didnt think about the fact that the breakfast creek, is about 500-550m elevation anyway...

I now have a new hunting spot!

EDIT: I live pretty close to this so called Agreiya, and might have to go check it out....is it near the aboriginal cave up there? rekon could be a nice new spot for gold coast meets :D

Edited by 2Deep2Handle

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woohoo qld you guys should come to the meet its in brisbane

Edited by bigred82

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ahhh...the ever elusive endangered aboriginal herb.... ive spent hours looking for it around the Mt. Warning caldera to no avail yet!

also synonomous with Justicia eranthemoides....keep an eye out for this one in particular barefootpicker(BFP)

So what does Isoglossa do? Is someone carefully collecting a few seeds to distribute around caring members?

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Cuttings/rhizomes are the best propagation method for Isoglossa. Seeds are tiny and really hard to come by.

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