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Marcel

Harvesting Leonitis leonurus/Wild Dagga/Lion's tail

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My Leonitis leonurus are flowering and looking pretty awesome at the moment. Any have any tips on how to best harvest and prepare the blooms and leaves? Cut a whole stem and hang to dry, or pluck leaves and petals separately?

Also, while we're at it, what are people's thoughts on this particular plant?

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have heard people state that the more resin on leaves the better, so i've always wondered what you would get if you put the plant through a bubble bag system so as just to collect the resin glands(trichomes?)

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I've only ever had the flowers and they where a pretty nice smoke the flavour was good and the effects where nicely subtle

I just picked the flowers off and let them dry in a paper bag I have heard the the leaves don't actually have any effect but maybe that was just from an outdated article I'll see if I can find it

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I'd imagine fan drying with room-temp air..(leaves, stems etc)

so u can tincture that shit

id eat or smoke the flowers

and those, i'd prefer fresh.

but s'gonna taste like ass either way.

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but s'gonna taste like ass either way.

yea don't make tea from them it tastes horrid

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I am a fan of lion's tail, haven't successfully managed to cultivate it yet though. Leaves are much harsher to smoke, and opinion really varies as to how active they are. I've found that most places touting the benefits of the leaves are trying to sell the leaves. Whatever you end up using, mix in a little clove for a much more pleasant smoke. :)

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yea don't make tea from them it tastes horrid

second that!!

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have heard people state that the more resin on leaves the better, so i've always wondered what you would get if you put the plant through a bubble bag system so as just to collect the resin glands(trichomes?)

Yup, I have heard that there is a resin on the leaves in hot/dry conditions that is scraped off the leaves and ingested. Somewhere on these forums probably.

Marcel, I've always plucked out the petals from my Leonotis and dried and then cured them and left the plants growing.. I am no expert on harvesting this plant tho.

As for effects, tea made using an espresso and lots of ground flowers was very nice, but horrible tasting as stated already.

Smoking it is alright but subtle compared to something like MJ, I don't like the taste it leaves in my mouth too much tho.. I imagine extracts would be the way to go.

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i just cut the flower heads off the plant, dry hanging in a dark dry room and pull the petals out and cure for a month. Very simple plant to harvest, i have never used the leaves just the petals, makes for a great couch locker when smoked.

D00d

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Thanks for the replies. Resin collection isn't going to happen in Sydney's rainy and cold weather this year... I didn't know that one could drink the stuff in a tea. Good to know.

Also, when you guys say you "cure" the petals, what exactly does that entail, other than drying them? Do you smoke cure them or something?

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'Opinion on activity'

is nothing more than a personal testament to senstivity.

All plants are active, and all life is conscious.

We plant heads, and those who've experienced, would do well to spread more effective

relationship paradigms than the old neurochemical argument.

ime this year, having let my bees whisper more

and more mysteries of the flowers bloom,

I do my best to use them fresh. To eat, or to make

tea from fresh blooms. For me, munchn wild flowr

fresh from the plant is at least 10x stronger experience

than thinking, preparing, degenerating the material and the relationship.

I reckon theres' always gonna be some goodies with fresh, that you'l miss

if prepared.But honestly, its as bitter as hell- you might like soaking it in some tastier

stuff before you dry it : )

p.s photos would be awesome! : )

Edited by mud
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Mine are just finishing flowering now (I collected a few petals but it's been raining non stop and most are ruined), where can I Find thes eeds/how do I collect the seeds?

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It is possible that the flowers and especially

resin of the plant is the most active

very easy to grow

PS It is Leonotis leonurus

Antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and antidiabetic effects of Leonotis leonurus(L.) R. BR. [Lamiaceae] leaf aqueous extract in mice and rats.

Ojewole J.A.O.

Methods and Findings in Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology. 27 (4) (pp 257-264), 2005.

AB The present study was undertaken to investigate the antinociceptive, antiinflammatory, and antidiabetic properties of the aqueous leaf extract of Leonotis leonurus (L.) R. BR. (Lamiaceae) in mice and rats, to scientifically appraise some of the plant's ethnomedical uses, and its safety and efficacy. The leaf powder of the plant was Soxhlet extracted with distilled water and used. The antinociceptive effect of the plant's extract was evaluated by the "hot-plate" and "acetic acid" test models of pain in mice, while the antiinflammatory and antidiabetic effects of the leaf extract were investigated in rats, using fresh egg albumin-induced paw edema, and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes mellitus, respectively. Morphine (MPN, 10 mg/kg i.p.), diclofenac (DIC, 100 mg/kg i.p.), and chlorpropamide (250 mg/kg p.o.) were used, respectively, as reference analgesic, antiinflammatory, and hypoglycemic agents for comparison. L. leonurus leaf aqueous extract (LLE, 50-800 mg/kg i.p.) produced dose-dependent and significant (p < 0.05-0.001) antinociceptive effects against thermally and chemically induced nociceptive pain stimuli in mice. LLE (50-800 mg/kg i.p.) also significantly (p < 0.05-0.001) inhibited fresh egg albumin-induced paw edema, and caused significant (p < 0.05-0.001) hypoglycemic effects in rats. It is suggested that the analgesic effects of LLE (50-800 mg/kg i.p.) may be peripherally and centrally mediated. The different flavonoids, diterpenoids, polyphenolics, and other chemical constituents of the plant may be involved in the observed antinociceptive, antiinflammatory, and antidiabetic effects of the plant's extract. However, the results of this experimental animal study suggest that the aqueous leaf extract of L. leonurus possesses antinociceptive, antiinflammatory, and hypoglycemic properties, and thus lend pharmacological credence to the suggested folkloric uses of the herb in the management and/or control of painful, arthritic, and other inflammatory conditions, as well as for adult-onset, type-2 diabetes mellitus in some communities of South Africa. 2005 Prous Science. All rights reserved.

Edited by michaelangelica

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Also, while we're at it, what are people's thoughts on this particular plant?

Smoking it has some similar flavours to ganja, but it's a bit rough. No effects experienced by me, however I've been given a jar of 10x extract in the past that's does get me a little bit high.

On a side note, I'm pretty sure i have seen this growing wild around Sydney/Greater Sydney. Anyone else spotted this popping up ? One place in particular (Bundeena in the Royal National Park) I'm preetty syre there's a heap of it growing.

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I used to live in Bundeena. Many moons ago... Way before I knew anything about these guys... Apparently there's a forest of them somewhere in Manly, in the bush. Might go for a hunt when the weather calms down a bit.

I have really intense reactions to MJ (full blown psychedelic ego death craziness from one puff), so I'm very curious to see how I go with this.

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Also, when you guys say you "cure" the petals, what exactly does that entail, other than drying them? Do you smoke cure them or something?

Curing is the process where chlorophyll is broken down. basically increase the natural flavours.. Important in producing nice MJ..

Heres a copy and paste from rollitup.. Now of course this relates to MJ, so some of the info is irrelevant.. But it gives you an idea of what curing does and some methods...

Curing is a process employed to naturally enhance the bouquet, flavour, and texture of marijuana. Curing does not lower potency when done correctly, although poor curing methods often result in some less of THC.

Curing is not an essential procedure, and many growers prefer the "natural" flavour of uncured grass. Sweet sinsemilla buds usually are not cured.

Curing is most successful on plants which have "ripened" and are beginning to lose chlorophyll. It is less successful on growing tips and other vigorous parts which are immature. These parts may only lose some chlorophyll.

Curing proceeds while the leaf is still alive, for until it dries, many of the leaf's life processes continue. Since the leaf's ability to produce sugars is thwarted, it breaks down stored starch to simple sugars, which are used for food. This gives the grass a sweet or earthy aroma and taste. At the same time, many of the complex proteins and pigments, such as chlorophyll, are broken down in enzymatic processes. This changes the colour of the leaf from green to various shades of yellow, brown, tan, or red, depending primarily on the variety, but also on growing environment and cure technique. The destruction of chlorophyll eliminates the minty taste that is commonly associated with green homegrown.

There are several methods of curing, most of which were originally designed to cure large quantities of tobacco. Some of them can be modified by the home grower to use for small marijuana harvests as well as large harvests. The methods used to cure marijuana are the air, flue, sweat, sun, and water cures.

Air Curing

Air curing is a technique developed in the United States for curing pipe and cigar tobacco. It was originally done in specially constructed barns made with ventilator slats which could be sealed; a small shed or metal building can easily be adapted for this use. However, this method of curing works only when there is enough material to keep the air saturated with moisture.

Wires are strung across the barn, and the marijuana plants or plant parts are hung from them, using string, wire twists, or the crooks of branches. The plants material should be closely spaced, but there should be enough room between branches (a few inches) so that air circulates freely. The building is kept unventilated until all the material loses some chlorophyll (green colour). This loss occurs rapidly during warm sunny weather because heat builds up, which hastens the cure. In wet or overcast weather, the temperature in the chamber will be cooler, and the process will proceed more slowly. If these conditions last for more than a day or two, unwanted mould may grow on the plants. The best way to prevent mould from forming is to raise the temperature to 90F by using a heater.

After the leaves have lost their deep green and become pale, the ventilator or windows are opened slightly, so that the temperature and humidity are lowered and the curing process is slowed. The process then continues until all traces of chlorophyll are eliminated. The entire process may take six weeks. Then the ventilators are opened, and an exhaust fan installed if necessary, to dry the material to the point that it can be smoked but still is moist, that is, bends rather than crumbles or powders when rubbed between thumb and forefinger.

Flue Curing

Flue curing differs from air curing in that the process is speeded up by using an external source of heat, and the air circulation is more closely regulated. This method can be used with small quantities of material in a small, airtight curing box constructed for the purpose. Large quantities can be hung in a room or barn as described in Air Curing.

A simple way to control the temperature when curing or drying small amounts of marijuana is to place the material to be cured in a watertight box (or a bottle) with ventilation holes on the top. Place the box in a water-filled container, such as a pot, fish-tank, or bathtub. The curing box contains air and will float. The water surrounding the box is maintained at the correct temperature by means of a stove or hotplate, fish-tank or water-bed heater, or any inexpensive immersible heater. Temperature of the water is monitored.

With the marijuana loosely packed, maintain water temperature at 90 degrees. After several days, the green tissue turns a pale yellow-green or murky colour, indicating yellow or brown pigments. Then increase temperature, to about 100 degrees, until all traces of green disappear. Raise the temperature once again, this time to 115 degrees, until a full, ripe colour develops. Also increase ventilation at this time, so that the marijuana dries. Plants dried at high temperature tend to be brittle; so lower the temperature before drying is completed. This last phase of drying can be done at room temperature, out of the water bath. The whole process takes a week or less.

marijuana cured by this technique turns a deep brown colour. Immature material may retain some chlorophyll and have a slight greenish cast. Taste is rich yet mild.

Sweat Curing

Sweat curing is the technique most widely used in Colombia. Long branches containing colas are layered in piles about 18 inches high and a minimum of two feet square, more often about ten by fifteen feet. Sweat curing actually incorporates the fermenting process. Within a few hours the leaves begin to heat up from the microbial action in the same way that a compost pile ferments. Then change in colour is very rapid; watch the pile carefully, so that it does not overheat and rot the colas. Each day unpack the piles, and remove the colas that have turned colour. Within four or five days, all the colas will have turned colour. They are then dried. One way to prevent rot while using this method is to place cotton sheets, rags, or paper towels between each double layer of colas. The towels absorb some of the moisture and slow down the process.

Sweat curing can be modified for use with as little marijuana as two large plants. Pack the marijuana tightly in a heavy paper sack (or several layers of paper bags), and place it in the sun. The light is converted to heat and helps support the sweat.

Another variation of the sweat process occurs when fresh undried marijuana is bricked. The bricks are placed in piles, and they cure while being transported.

A simple procedure for a slow sweat cure is to roll fresh marijuana in plastic bags. Each week, open the bag for about an hour to evaporate some water. In about six weeks, the ammonia smell will dissipate somewhat, and the grass should be dried. This cure works well with small quantities of mediocre grass, since it concentrates the material.

Sun Curing

A quick way to cure small quantities of marijuana os to loosely fill a plastic bag or glass jar, or place a layer between glass or plastic sheets, and expose the material to the sun. Within a few hours the sun begins to bleach it. Turn the marijuana every few hours, so that all parts are exposed to the sun. An even cure is achieved in one to two days {(see Plate 16)}. Some degradation of THC may occur using this method.

Water Cure

Unlike other curing methods, the water cure is performed after the marijuana is dried. Powder and small pieces are most often used, but the cure also works with whole colas. The material is piled loosely in a glass or ceramic pot which is filled with Luke-warm water. (When hot water is used, some of the THC is released in oils, which escape and float to the top of the water.) Within a few hours many of the non-psychoactive water-soluble substances dissolve. An occasional gentle stirring speeds the process. The water is changed and the process repeated. Then the grass is dried again for smoking.

THC is not water-soluble; so it remains on the plant when it is soaked. By eliminating water-soluble substances (pigments, proteins, sugars, and some resins), which may make up 25 percent of the plant material by weight, this cure may increase the concentration of THC by up to a third.

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those statments of people saying dagga is harsh and rough to smoke is incorrect, those people have not cured there product.

seth's post tells how to cure herbs.

if you smoke fresh un cured mj, it tastes rough aswell.

dagga is in fact a very mild and lovly smoke.

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Well, here's a photo of one of my plants (white variety).

post-7825-0-91758400-1331204137_thumb.jp

And here are some photos of the mythical wild Leonitis crop in Manly that I mentioned earlier. I really did think it was bullshit, but there you go! It took my about 30 minutes of driving to find it. I must be some sort of Schultes ethnobot genius or something! There are at least 50 plants, probably much more. I'll harvest in the morning. Hurrah!

post-7825-0-82450200-1331204215_thumb.jp

post-7825-0-39222400-1331204395_thumb.jp

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marcel, mate

what happened??

as for my use of this plant: smoked 5 cones of SAB's stronger extract (i think it was 19:1 compared to 16:1?) to no avail. maybe a slight tobacco style head feeling, but very mild. and i do hate tobacco. maybe i am just very sensitive to nicotinic stimulation.

i cant believe some people have to look for this..in melbourne and gippsland its in like every second front yard. though i have never seen a true wild population, that would be pretty cool.

there is a spot in my old town where subs AND amanitas grow within 30cm of each other, under a leonotis. pretty cool scene.

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