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First steps into A. Phlebophylla

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This is for a couple of people including amazonian (sorry didn't want to hijack sallyd's thread), yeah amz, people did have success with the seed batch that went around, more or less 100% for me.

These are old photos and not the best pics but is something, have a good one.

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Edited by gerbil
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They're healthy looking little things.

How did you germinate them Gerbil ?

I did the hot water soak with the seeds I had from that batch and I didn't get one to germinate.

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It looks like coco coir in those pots, but if not I would also like to know what proccess was used.

I filed the edges (just enough so i could see a bit of the white embryo) of 5 seeds and soaked them in warm to the touch water overnight and all 5 are now swollen and the weather is right for sowing.

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All hot h20 soaks, then planted to a light seed raising mix after removing all the larger bullshit barkchips (stop myself there from a big rant), keep it somewhat fluffy and don't compact it, it's quite easy for the seed to sit in a stagnant pocket and fuzz up with mold if soil is not appropriate, firmed down or kept too moist for too long.

Kept moist, but allowed to dry a little before heavy misting the tube top when needed. What didn't come up was dug up and I cut bits of the coat away with a very sharp pocket knife, I find it simple but am working with knives and delicate things all the time so second nature really, some people will probably cut their fingers off if not careful or damage the seed, but really such little force is needed, just be slow and steady.

So I guess to combine it all for better success,

A hot water soak, following by some coat removal of the softened coat (much easier than hard) then planting in an airy mix, then a bright warm spot, warm days cool nights no doubt beneficial.

If it sprouts out of soil and the seed coat doesn't shed i pinch the extreme tips firmly in an upward motion, if you do it correct you generaly will get the leathery coat to slip off 100% of the time without damaging any of the cotyledons etc.

I use a native blood and bone powdered fert when I see any need it, response is great and axilliary buds raring to go.

Attention to detail is really the key, I work on feeling these days I find it just guides me. No neo-hippy bullshit, but if you calm your mind, things really just open up and communicate, it's hard to describe.

Also no need to go gung ho, do a seed at a time or a small batch until you get it nailed.

edit: that coir is just a top dressing from an innoculant experiment, wasn't essential for their success.

Edited by gerbil
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All hot h20 soaks, then planted to a light seed raising mix after removing all the larger bullshit barkchips (stop myself there from a big rant)

Hey gerbil... you should never stop your 'rants' because we can all benefit from what you have to say. Rant away!.

Its great to hear that there was some success with these seeds...it gives me a little bit of hope.

Thanks gerbil.

:)

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Hey thanks a lot. Looks like simple is the way. After my faillures and research I realized that in nature most seeds must remain exposed/ stuck within rock cracks and receiving water/ humidity from clean streams and night/ day diferencial temps.

I hope I'll have the chance to have another go at these beauties someday :)

Best of luck for the growing process.

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thanks gerbil the thread looks much more complete with photos

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Still fairly small and of varying sizes (and varying ages), but well established, still trying to track down various materials for their first potting on, want a really nice mix so won't be rushing it.

I'm trying for good macros for diagnostic, nice stipules and glands etc, but I don't really know what i'm doing and getting these were hard enough haha, soon I guess.

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Edited by gerbil
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There seems to be quite a few A.phleb' threads now?!.

I got some seeds from PD last year (I think it was last year?..first round of seeds anyway). I did a hot water stratification(?) on a few (but had already scarified them...bad move) and planted them and watched the soil for weeks and weeks, and nothing happened. I pulled back the soil to look for the seeds but they must have rotted away.I waited some time to have another go at what i had left.

The second round of seeds went around SAB and i took note of what other people were doing, like removing the seed coat etc... So i tried this on a few more seeds... Again... nothing :(.

I recently bought some gibberellic acid, and scarified the rest of the seeds i had, and soaked them in the gibberellic. After like 24 hours they had swollen somewhat and i was able to remove the seed coat and then planted in some seed raising mix. After a week a seed had germinated :), but at like day 5 a slug or snail ate it. :(. Another seed germinated in the meantime and i moved the container to a snail/slug free zone. This seedling decided to die at like day 8. Then another two seedlings emerged :)... one is looking alright, the other not so good.

Anyway... i have crossed the hurdle of germination... now to just get the buggers to survive to adulthood.

(Soil looks overly damp..yes, but it was just watered. Seed raising mix is pretty shitty too, i used what i had.).

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Yeah that was my big hurdle too. can get them to germinate but critters find them a tasty snack. bastids.

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Though I haven't had the pleasure of a Phleb experience yet, I wanted to share something that I read about legume post-germination growing tip: that legumes benefit from the nodules of other legumes in the early stages of growth, before the new seedling has had time to establish it's own nodules. Has anyone else heard or experimented with this? I took the tip and spread Desmanthus illinoensis seed, which is very easy to grow, in my Acacia pots & was pleased with the results, an overall increase in vigor of both. Anyway, just a bit from my experience, & if Others have contrary experience or caveats, let us know, but it seemed a good run for me in the first year. Cheers!

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Hey Gerbil,

The Phleb seedlings look great. Just wondering do you have an update on how they are growing now. Any photos?

Cheers,

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