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myco

MYCO'S GUIDE TO CREATING OUTDOOR PATCH'S FOR WOODLOVERS

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Well done...very informative. A big plus for you....How moist would you need to keep the wood chips? Would the species you grow be restricted to the climate you are in? Sorry but when it comes to shrooms I'm a real noob.... .. I've been meaning to try something similar myself but fear of failure and a lazy disposition. (only with legal edibles of course)

Do you sell bags of woodchips :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:

Edit to save arse

Edited by Dolos

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Very informative, and very interesting, but...

What's the legality of this? If you were just preparing a garden bed with mulch and mushrooms grew, I think it would be fine, but surely this would be viewed as cultivation? Perhaps it would have been better to use stropharia aurantiaca or something for illustrative purposes.

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Great tek myco. I am thinking of starting an edibles outdoor patch next year and will use this for sure.

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in reply to ballzac
i have added the following disclaimer to the begining and end of the original post

(PLEASE NOTE THE SPECIES USED WAS STROPHARIA PLEASE DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS WITH ANY KIND OF ILLEGAL MUSHROOMS PICTURES ARE FOR ILLISTRATIVE PURPOSES ONLY

also in reply to dolos
ofcourse for outdoor growing you must be in the right climate for watever it is your trying to grow
and no i do not sell woodchips

Edited by myco
  • Like 2

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Cheers for the tek, it's always great being able to look at the pictures besides the information, it just seeps in better :)

I'd never really heard of the wood plug tek as i've always seen it marketed for shiitake but that seems like a fucking awesome idea, would it work for subs though? I've seen sub mycelium growing from small branches and bits of wood but never from a big log before.

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yes it will work for with any woodlovers

Edited by myco

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Awesome, good work spreading around the love :D

I got another question though..

I can't see any grass growing around your sub patch, the greenery in the fruiting pictures look like fresh pine needles. So... are you fruiting without grass growing in the pine chips?

edit: and congrats on what I think is the first successful use of tags on this forum.

Edited by Distracted

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yes they do fruit without grass growing around them

there was a nearby pine tree and i often threw pine needles around over the patch

if you throw enough down it helps keep moisture in and helps keep the acidity up aswell

as you can see by the first picture of the fruits there is no need for either grass or the pine needles though

the tag thing is cool i think its a good thing to have :)

Edited by myco

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Nice work myco.

What woods would you use for Gyms?, anything other than paperbark?

What woods have you used for the subs?

Do you have any more to share about the the unID'd active species?, Psilo?

"i do this by simply placing as many layers of cardboard on the ground as possible

(this also acts to stop the weeds growing in your garden)"

Weeds/plants growing through the patch usualy provide a better microclimate trapping humidity & keeping temperatrues more constant, the plants also channel water so you get lots of pinning & subsequent fruits around the plants, your plants do better with fungi & vice versa. But I can understand not wanting 'weeds' in your garden.

"i now take some fresh woodchips and layer them over the top as thick as i possibly can the thicker the better

it should look something like this"

If you lay the chips to thick it takes a long time to colonize & will fruit poorly or not at all your 1st season. About 4 inches max seems good.

"get yourself some logs drill some holes throughout the logs and place either colonised cardboard or woodchips inside

the holes i like to then plug the holes up with some pieces of fresh uncolonised cardboard

this should last long enough to allow the mycelium to take over the log from the inside out

you can see in the picture below where i have drilled holes in this particular log"

Love it!, you can leave logs on top or buried in a patch to colonize & do the same thing, just knock a bit of bark off with a hatchet or handsaw to let the myc in. I have seen logs about 5m away from a patch that have been colonized... crazy how far it sniffs out new wood.

Have you tried hessian instead of cardboard?, works a treat, is more durable, breathable & flexible than cardboard which can have advantages.

  • Like 1

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Nice work myco.

thanks :)

What woods would you use for Gyms?, anything other than paperbark?

banksia is also good for gyms

What woods have you used for the subs?

I haven't done any subs but I would say

pine and any kind of eucalypt should be fine

Do you have any more to share about the the unID'd active species?, Psilo?

http://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/14524880

excuse the panalous wording in the thread name

(i dont know how the hell to change the thread name either)

they are clearly not any kind of pan alot of the first older specimens we were finding resembled some kind of panalous

then we begun to find a whole lot more and they are definately an active psilocybe of some kind

i will be sending specimens out for microscopy next season just never quite got around to it last season

its a long thread but if you go through it theres alot of good pics in there :)

"i do this by simply placing as many layers of cardboard on the ground as possible

(this also acts to stop the weeds growing in your garden)"

Weeds/plants growing through the patch usualy provide a better microclimate trapping humidity & keeping temperatrues more constant, the plants also channel water so you get lots of pinning & subsequent fruits around the plants, your plants do better with fungi & vice versa. But I can understand not wanting 'weeds' in your garden.

we get alot of kikuya grass (i think thats how its spelt haha)

the shit goes nuts and is not something you want in your garden instead i plant loads of ferns

of all kinds and various other plants to help keep that microclimate happening as you can see in the first picture before the pics of the fruits

"i now take some fresh woodchips and layer them over the top as thick as i possibly can the thicker the better

it should look something like this"

If you lay the chips to thick it takes a long time to colonize & will fruit poorly or not at all your 1st season. About 4 inches max seems good.

edited

"get yourself some logs drill some holes throughout the logs and place either colonised cardboard or woodchips inside

the holes i like to then plug the holes up with some pieces of fresh uncolonised cardboard

this should last long enough to allow the mycelium to take over the log from the inside out

you can see in the picture below where i have drilled holes in this particular log"

Love it!, you can leave logs on top or buried in a patch to colonize & do the same thing, just knock a bit of bark off with a hatchet or handsaw to let the myc in. I have seen logs about 5m away from a patch that have been colonized... crazy how far it sniffs out new wood.

yeh its definately a great way to do it

very quick and very very effective once you get the mycelium established it go's nuts you cant stop it :)

Have you tried hessian instead of cardboard?, works a treat, is more durable, breathable & flexible than cardboard which can have advantages.

unfortunately i've never had hessian to try it with would imagine it would be a great thing to try

i've always just used old cardboard boxes free and easy to get :)

Edited by myco

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Did you use any sawdust on your patch? I've heard it works wonders for myc growth as the myc just mungs through the sawdust like no tomorrow :)

Good read mate! Looking into growing some nice juicy edibles so going to have to remember this.

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i did use sawdust in a few spots

the myc takes over the saw dust quickly but the sawdust is so thin and small

the myc just eats up pretty quickly

once you get that real rizho myc goin through the woodchips

i find it grows just as quickly as with sawdust and has a lot more to feed off

theres just no stopping it once it starts :)

Edited by myco

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this is fantastic! great job myco you've created a clear and easy to follow start to finish guide. no more excuses, everyone should have one of these in their garden now!

  • Like 1

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Nice teck.

I have colinized a patch of woodchips outside just by placing a few store bought enoki mushrooms in it. Doubt it will last the summer though.

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transfer -

in ease

.. inspiration

 

just image !

 

 

 

 

.

IMG_9308.JPG

Edited by mysubtleascention

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Hey everyone,

Sorry for digging up an old thread.

I've only colonised a few pieces of cardboard (last season in Melb) and buried them in the garden under some woodchips in ~late August. I've seen a bit of colonised woodchip in that patch, so that's a good sign. I'm just wondering what sort of timeline were talking for each step here? And is there an ideal time of year/season for each step?

Also when colonising a piece of cardboard, is it best to keep it in a sealed container or open? And indoors or outdoors?

Thanks! :)

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question for myco: when you eventually prepare the garden bed for your cardboard and woodchip lasagne, i notice you say to lay down cardboard in the bed, then put pieces of your lasagne down, then cover it with woodchips.  Is this mostly about keeping out grass from underneath? why not have a layer of woodchips in contact with the soil and then put down the pieces of "lasagne" on this ground layer and then cover with more woodchips? what is the thinking about putting down a layer of cardboard and then the pieces of "lasagne"?

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On 04/02/2016 at 11:03 AM, Rock1084 said:

Hey everyone,

Sorry for digging up an old thread.

I've only colonised a few pieces of cardboard (last season in Melb) and buried them in the garden under some woodchips in ~late August. I've seen a bit of colonised woodchip in that patch, so that's a good sign. I'm just wondering what sort of timeline were talking for each step here? And is there an ideal time of year/season for each step?

Also when colonising a piece of cardboard, is it best to keep it in a sealed container or open? And indoors or outdoors?

Thanks! :)

Rock1084,  i do the colonising of cardboard  inside the house, to remind me to check them every few days to see that the cardboard is moist.  i do this duing the winter season when the myc is available.  this season i have layers of wet cardboard sitting in an open glass dish. the layers of wet cardboard are between a folded piece of cardboard on the outside that dries out before the inner layers do.   i periodically pour some collected rainwater on the inner and outer cardboard to keep it all moist. my outer cardboard has some spots of mould or something on it now so i'm gonna get rid of it and start making the "lasagne" that myco mentioned in OP and will do that inside a plastic container.  i hope to transfer the lasgne to prepared beds in early spring / september, or by october (ive read on the forums that people reckon myc grows well in spring) then i guess it's a matter of keeping it moist throughout the year and see how you go by the following winter.

 

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