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cactusfriend

Sausage Plant

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what is the sausage plant?

Could it be used effectively as a grafting stock?

Edited by Moderator.

Edited by cactusfriend

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i think the sausage plant is just a cacti that terminates growth every season and starts to pup again from the termination point at the start of every new growth spurt. There is someone selling a pachanoi sausage plant on gumtree adelaide at the moment ! not sure if this growth charecteristic is exclusive to the pach. There are probably more people on here that can elaborate further but thats my understanding of it anyway. Hope that helps

(edit) spelling

Edited by tipz

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i think the sausage plant is just a cacti that terminates growth every season and starts to pup again from the termination point at the start of every new growth spurt. There is someone selling a pachanoi sausage plant on gumtree adelaide at the moment ! not sure if this growth charecteristic is exclusive to the pach. There are probably more people on here that can elaborate further but thats my understanding of it anyway. Hope that helps

(edit) spelling

Wow that is wild! now the name makes sense. It looks pretty decorative :drool2:.

Edited by cactusfriend

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Wow thats an amazing pedro Tipz

I thought sausage plants (the cactus ones) were Armatocereus spp.

Boy do i stand corrected

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I think all trichos climb trees in the right conditions, seen a few different types doing it. Bloody cool though, got to get some of mine to do that. Pretty sure sausage plant comes from Fields originally and is one of the plants from sth america. Been called a pach or macro depending on who you ask. Will find out more next time i'm out there, havn't got a cut of that one yet, definatly on the list. Very cool cactus :)

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i received a cactus from tst that fits this description, grows in segments. its very cool. :)

tst may be able to elaborate further.

Edited by incognito

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10 bucks!!! goodness shared

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i received a cactus from tst that fits this description, grows in segments. its very cool. :)

tst may be able to elaborate further.

yep, thats the one. i think of it as a peruvianus.it doesnt terminate all arms every season ,it is variable.

t s t .

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The segment I have in my hand bought from Adelaide has short spines almost identical with some blue peruvianus cultivars.

It has a more mid green colour though.

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According to Mr Fields, it's Bridgesii lageniformis.

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Is far from a bridgie, although im still undcecided whether to slot it into pachanoi or peruvianus. There is one nice stand of it at fields but i have seen a lot come out of SA and have got from both sources. Man SA has a ship load of cactus scattered about the place, just got a few pics from my uncle who is over there a fair bit. One picture is the mother of all pedros, i have seen some bigguns 6 or 7 mtrs but this one is ridiculous and with a jumbled pile of cuttings infront of it the size of a car lmao, gotta find out where it is. As for the climbing tree thing lol, a shade grown etoliated limb that falls onto a bracnch then bends back upward.... not really climbing but i guess ppl see things differently

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Is far from a bridgie, although im still undcecided whether to slot it into pachanoi or peruvianus.

i just got a nice little cutting of this from tripsis (thanks mate :) i have sfa to go off except the base of the cutting is a chunk of old mature plant & i agree with you that it doesn't look at all like bridgesii except one thing that struck me was that the main central spines on the mature stump have that distinctive downward bend right at the base which as far as i know in trichocereus is a uniquely bridgesii trait. the bend perhaps is not as prominent as a pedigree bridgesii but is definitely there.

that alone makes me pretty curious... can anyone confirm this observation?

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Fields has two clumps out there PD, another one out by the back dam ;) Wouldn't have a clue what the freaky thing is, just passing on what I was told when I scored my cut. I can see pach, peru and bridgey traits in it. Depending on who you ask all three are variants of the same thing anyway so not much point going down that road in my book. It's an awesome freaky plant, and now I've got a cut. All I'm concerned with :)

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Depending on who you ask all three are variants of the same thing anyway so not much point going down that road in my book

haha for sure. I thoought there was only the one clump in the bush block near the dam. Hard to pay attention out there some times lol.

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Hard to pay attention out there some times lol.

Most definatly, I walk around the joint half in a daze drooling :drool2: There's another clump in the main garden inbetween the roseii 2 and lamproclorus clumps on the little windy dirt track ;)

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ok.. could someone who has a mature piece of this who IS interested in genetics confirm or refute the presence of at least some central spines that show this downward bend at the base? pointless or not, this i think would confirm that it has some 'bridgesii' genes. pach, peru & bridgi likely are the same 'species' but i'm intereted in identifying distinct genetic lines not just making species distinctions..

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I have a section I bought from Sirjeans here in SA, whose origin is unknown to me.

Seems to have almost horizontal yet slighty downward facing central spines.

The pups that have emerged have a dark almost slightly red spination which then lose colour.

Pretty amatuer description but it might help you a little

cheers - tipz

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Some spines do seem to have the downward kink in them, others have an upward bend. Yowie also has the distinct downward kink/bend in the spines although much more pronounced than the sausage. Some spines are swollen at the base also on snags.

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These plants have been added to the SAB webstore in both standard and large sizes. Ours came labelled Segmented Echinopsis lageniformis although they do not look like a typical lag.

post-902-0-43590400-1373761852_thumb.jpg

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