folias

Acacia Floribunda

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i've noticed theres a few sub strains of floribunda? there seems to be one with slighty shorter and thinner leaves, and then a thicker leaved variety... is either or better for spice content?

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Don't know if there is information on that ^ but, for Bluntmuffin, Snu Voogelbreinder published tests by J of Acacia floribunda.

There are high alkaloid maidenii in the right spots or seasons.

Edited by phyllode
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I heard you can notice effects from puffing dried phyllodes Acacia fimbriata (Brisbane golden wattle), can anyone see any major danger in this?

Possibly it is floribunda that has been misidentified though, so I will take some photos tomorrow and upload them for ID.

I hope it is fimbriata

Edited by Leaves

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^ no they are different acacias all together. When I google your plant it doesn't match what I know nationally as floribunda.

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Completely different floral features.

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I've found most commercial varieties of floribunda down in victoria to be generally inactive.. or at least devoid of the compound most seek
Edited by bricklaya

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Also from vic and im certain on the content in floribunda. Bark and leaves.

Ive never come accross cyanide problems but in such scarce amounts I doubt it could cause any serious problems?? Im NO expert AT ALL but from what ive heard isn't there cyanide in apples, table salt ect..

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On 2/8/2011 at 11:27 AM, folias said:

Instead of going out there and trying to find Acacia Obutsifolia and going through all the hard work to get some bark and possibly maim or destroy some native flora, there is a far more common tree and it is called "Acacia Floribunda", which is more common, and has a very friendly, refined tryptamine content.

Unlike, Obtusifolia, where you will get a small tryptamine content out of the phyllodes from most strains, you will get 0.3-4% from the Phyllodes that is of killer quality and that you can make brews from.

Also, this goes for Acuminata on the west coast, the phyllodes contain up to 1.5%, so I hear. The bark contains more, but at these sorts of yields who is complaining when it is so much easier to take the phyllodes.

I guess people are taking the phyllodes of these species because bark has traditionally been taken because Obtusifolia phyllodes are not to be useful in SOME strains - having said that, some strains on the south coast of NSW, contain good quality tryptamines at about 0.5%.

KNOW YOUR STRAIN!

Julian.


Is this still the belief present day 2017 regarding floribunda being a more consistent (and more abundant/ethical) acacia to hunt for vs obtusifolia?
What I mean is, are quality obtusifolia phyllodes less common/consistent than floribunda?
Here's a more recent account of success, not sure it means anything.

 

Edited by Skellum
grammar

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2 hours ago, Skellum said:


Is this still the belief present day 2017 regarding floribunda being a more consistent (and more abundant/ethical) acacia to hunt for vs obtusifolia?
What I mean is, are quality obtusifolia phyllodes are less consistent/common than floribunda?

 

Bait & switch ?

 

Show me the tlc and GCMS on that extract from the link you supplied & I'll reconsider, but a full percentage point from something that's shown to yield nothing or close to nothing just seems like BS to me.

 

Floribunda is a nice tree but unless your seeds are sourced from a known strain/cultivar, you'll just be spinning your wheels. The vast majority of it is pure bunk.

 

That also applies to a lesser degree to ob's and acuminatas. Some acuminatas don't produce much until they are fully established trees (10 years +) & the ob's have a lot of seasonal variability, especially in young trees.

 

I'd grow a patch of Phalaris from a known strain in preference to floribunda any day.

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^ Thats a great reply sal, much appreciated & exactly the kind of straight forward answer I was looking for.

Can I ask what are some key visual indicators to look out for to spot a quality obtusifolia?
Check out these pix I have here, I'm under the assumption both specimens are obtusifolia (crusty margins, right look, starting to show flower buds nowish etc).
One patch shows very prominent reddening of the phyllodes, where as most other patches show just standard looking phyllodes. Is the red coloration something to look out for?

Redpatch Examples:
Obtusi1.thumb.jpg.cb233fef93b8624b7e2f0f1036c0d53f.jpgObtusi2.thumb.jpg.31a57dd62652e8b57c4320c6b8fecb9e.jpgObtusi3.thumb.jpg.c6a627e5509dbd0923f5319d4be532fc.jpg
Standard Examples:
Obtus1.thumb.jpg.d434cee80243a459b9cdc7be31143cb8.jpgObtus3.thumb.jpg.05a8c8be737e525901875e5d5e911e1a.jpgObtus2.thumb.jpg.3ca8c5d0a1a7ee0a6c2e404c8c697874.jpg
 

EDIT: Both sets of pix (patches) taken same day, same mountain, but a couple KM's apart from each other on same said mountain.

Edited by Skellum
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Red colouration indicates the plant is experiencing lockout of P, often in cold weather, but new growth shows this too.

I don't think there is any reliable visual indicator for obtusifolia. They range from shorter fat phyllodes to narrow elongated ones and the same tree can vary at different times. Generally speaking, yields are reduced after heavy rain, during flowering and in winter. YMMV.

 

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Some have a very greasy sheen and nearly no red colouration,
Others have this red colouration to mostly young phyllodes some older ones too with a more matte look and less sheen, similar to courtii's red & purple colouring in the younger phyllodes.
I wonder what the secret to spotting decent ones is. Hmmm...

The Longifolia you helped me ID that were flowering a few months back are all growing wicked seed pods now, THOUSANDS of seed pods.

If these obtusifolia are flowering now over the next month or two, when should I expect to see seed pods, about 2-3 months after flowering finishes?
Would collecting seeds from this unique stand that is showing prominent reddening even in the young phyllodes be a good idea, or really is it hard to say without bioassay?
So winter is no good, Flowering periods are no good, Seed production periods are no good, and Rainy periods are no good. Hmmm... So we are aiming for a dry period during what season/months for best mileage?

Thanks for all your legendary tips and info Glaukus, you're like a mother(fucker) to me. Xo

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I personally like trees that have a super crusty margin on the phyllodes. You'll know what I mean when you run your finger along one. The crusty red stuff intrigues me. I need to investigate if this stuff has any particular properties...might be a good summer project!

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I know the feeling and am looking for that feeling as a key point for identification.
I notice it most prominently in the younger phyllodes, as they mature they seem to lose there crust as the leaf lengthens/broadens.
Will a desirable specimen display crusting even on the more mature phyllodes?

Thx again.

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I'm only saying they're desirable to me visually, it's not a scientific endorsement!

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