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Alkaloids and black wattle

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is black wattle bark worth doing a pull from, ive been told different answers to this and im

quite confused - :unsure:

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It would be good if there was anything worth pulling from Black wattle as its thick around here, the council is always cutting it up...

From the info i've got its not worth trying mate.

BUT..

I could be wrong :blush:

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there are about 6 totally different Acacia species (& one or two that aren't even acacia) which are called "black wattle" so it's impossible to know what you're talking about. some of those species could have interesting potential apparently. do you mean A. decurrens? if so i wouldn't bother one bit but don't take my word for it as i have no experience with it. just be careful, some of the alkaloids that might be present in these plant could be illegal

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A. concurrens or late flowering black wattle is worth investigating from what I understand. Hard to id though as its practically identical to A. leiocalyx or early flowering black wattle. From the research I did a while back the easiest to way to differentiate is the differing flowering period between the 2. To complicate matters more the 2 species are thought to crossbreed.

This info is from vague memory so do your own research. Its a place to start though.

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I recently found out that the street name here for one of the wattle alkaloids is "Black Wattle" :wink:

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would someone be able to post pics of these species that are similar to the black wattle and also a pic of black wattle bark and leave structure.

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would someone be able to post pics of these species that are similar to the black wattle and also a pic of black wattle bark and leave structure.

haha this is the point man, 'black wattle' is a name used for many different plants & they all look totally different afaik so no-one really knows what the hell anyone's talking about... so which one of the multitude of different 'black wattles' do you want to know if 'black wattle' looks like lol & how on earth is anyone to know what plant you wabt to see the bark & leaf structure of?

is it just me or is this a ridiculous conversation?

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look up ...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Wattle... if you type in the names of any of the species listed on this page on google images you should be able to see pictures of each...

i have always been able to distinguish leiocalyx from concurrens when they are not in flower by their leaf colour... A. concurrens has a distinctive rusty grey sheen to its leaves while A. leiocalyx leaves are a clean glossy green with red tips...

hope this helps

Edited by volcanicplug

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Cheers for the id tip VP :) Crap load of leiocalyx around my neck of the woods and I'm chucking some concurrens seed down soon so I'll be able to put your method to the test one day :wink:

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Half my block is black wattle - annoying because it always falls over in the moist forest... makes a nice beer from its seed though....

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im actually more interested in the potential of the grey wattle.

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SWIM's FOAF recently tested Acacia Concurrens Bark (late flowering Black Wattle) finding it was defiantly active, yielding mostly DMT N-Oxide. SWIM's FOAF is no chemist but advises this tree is defiantly worth looking into.

how do you know it was n oxide?

t s t .

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Just a thought but some of the local chatter about 'black wattle' may come form the fact that a shop used to sell an extract labled as 'black wattle' extract, I think it said it was a.Melanoxyln specificly.

I always assumed this was a red herring?

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fydesvindico please have a little discretion

Also, I would suggest that your assumptions are a little off track.

Edited by AndyAmine.

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Colloquial names are such a cause of confusion.

That 'black wattle extract' some shops used to sell I seem to remember as another 'spice enriched' concoction.

I've heard A. mearnsi referenced to as black wattle before, and same with Callicoma serratifolia....

Callicoma has always intrigued me, and I've never found a decent analysis on it's chemistry. Yes it's everywhere but it has this really interesting look about it, like it is advertising something... similar to the way A. obtusifolia advertises itself by looking psychadelic...

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i'd like to point out that in a population such as those of acacia, that genetic variation is well known and that specimens vary to such a degree that generalizations fail

one might find an exceptional specimen which defies the norm in many cases, few alkaloid studies are detailed enough to provide any conclusive data

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this is probably resurrecting a really old thread,
but any black wattle search in google eventually turns up this thread.
soooo.... given this thread was started in 2010 ... and it's 2015 now?
so we know which wattle that "black wattle" changa was made from??

conurrens, decurrens, melanoxylon or meansrii, or other?

im sure the internet would love to put this one to rest. thankyou folks!

Edited by bio
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Paradox outlined how enigmatic the black wattle name is. It depends what part of the country you come from and local traditions.

I don't think you're going to get any clarification on this topic.

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http://herbalistics.com.au/product/acacia-concurrens-black-wattle-seed/

"concurrens belongs to a section of the Acacia genus which has members well known for their chemistry, including A. obtusifolia, A. phlebophylla and A. maidenii. M. Bock lists this species as giving a +++ alkaloid test from bark."

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In these acacia species.. can anyone tell me whether these are 5Meo or nnDMT profiles?

You Aussies are lucky in terms of climate and habitat for these types of plants..

In Canada where I live the only ample source of DMT in indigenous flora Im aware of is Reed Canary Grass.. (and its 5Meo which isn't my preference)

while people @ DMT Nexus and elsewhere.. have been trying to solve the dilemma of separating harmful alkaloids or alkaloids in this RCG plant with unpleasant effects.. (dark colours) I was hopeful about their efforts at first… now I hold little hope they will come to a fruitful solution or tek thats applicable for the average person..

Cheers buds.. cw

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Hi Charlie, there are very few acacias that have been proven to contain any significant amounts of 5meo.

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