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Help with acacia cultivation needed!!

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On 7/6/2017 at 2:24 PM, smithy said:

Hey, Frost will kill acuminatas and courtii. floribunda may survive.

Not Mine:)

 

Im in the ACT 

 

My 2 acuminatas are very happy growing outside in the ground in -7c temp to 40c

Grown from seed

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3 hours ago, mole said:

Not Mine:)

 

Im in the ACT 

 

My 2 acuminatas are very happy growing outside in the ground in -7c temp to 40c

Grown from seed

Clap clap, well done.  you must be very proud

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"Frost" is a complex stress though. If plants progressively get used to the colder season they are more tolerant than an out of season/early frost (killing frost) . Also the slower the thaw the less damage sustained. Theres a few tricks that can be done if one searches about....

 

I've got acuminata through cold/frost as well, have had some minor damage on some, but bounced back...floribunda takes it well. Havent got to courtii yet , but I am dubious...I reckon thats gunna have to be against a wall ect. I always give tubestock a treebag to improve microclimate.

 

Microclimate makes or breaks the success of some species when outta their general comfort zones.

They wont grow at the same rates outta range....

 

 

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yeah mun been dying to say my acuminatas and maidenii survived -16C in uk 

- to the best of my knowledge they were broad phyllode but came labelled as just acuminata 

(WSS were the source back then .. about 2012/13 or something? - dang memory - perhaps they were their own produced seed from nu yoik? it's a lot colder in nu yoik than here as far as wherever i went in nu yoik - mainly manhattan , walking on river hudson)

 

if only they'd survived my mum and a dark appartment

Edited by ☽Ţ ҉ĥϋηϠ₡яღ☯ॐ€ðяئॐ♡Pϟiℓℴϟℴ
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14 hours ago, waterboy 2.0 said:

"Frost" is a complex stress though. If plants progressively get used to the colder season they are more tolerant than an out of season/early frost (killing frost) . Also the slower the thaw the less damage sustained. Theres a few tricks that can be done if one searches about....

 

I've got acuminata through cold/frost as well, have had some minor damage on some, but bounced back...floribunda takes it well. Havent got to courtii yet , but I am dubious...I reckon thats gunna have to be against a wall ect. I always give tubestock a treebag to improve microclimate.

 

Microclimate makes or breaks the success of some species when outta their general comfort zones.

They wont grow at the same rates outta range....

 

 

 

100%, Mircoclimate is key to growing plants outside there zone.  mt buffolo would be the better option for the colder climates and a it's a outstanding tree.

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17 hours ago, smithy said:

 

...  mt buffolo would be the better option for the colder climates and a it's a outstanding tree.

That's what I hear. If anyone could direct me towards getting seeds, I'd be grateful. 

 

...So far, what I'm hearing from you guys is this: from most cold tolerant (top) to least cold tolerant (bottom). 

1. phlebophylla

2.floribunda

3. acuminata

4.maidenii

5. courtii

 

I welcome more discussion and experiences.  Or if you can add to/rearrange that list. 

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hello.  what can i do for an over pot-ashed courtii?    all leaves have died, but scratching the wood is still green.  
thankyou. 

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First frost of the season last night, low of -1.5C, below freezing for only a few hours.

 

Only observed frost damage on one plant, that being a courtii. (first image, blackened curling tips on newest phyllodes)

 

Five other courtii appear unharmed. Through late autumn's cool temperatures, all have developed red "splotches" on phyllodes.  (second image)

 

And just a few notes to summarize my first Acacia seed growing season:

(in order from failures to successes)

mucronata vars. mucronata & longfolia growing extremely slowly, still in seedling stage after 2 months. 

burkittii low germination, very slow growing (only perhaps half a dozen phyllodes after several months; some plants inexplicably turned brown and died. 

acuminata slow growing (especially narrow phyllode), very susceptible to being eaten by animals (furthermore did not resprout after being bitten off, just died)

floribunda growing well, regrows after animal browsing, explosive growth from fertilized plants. 

courtii grew quite well- good germination rate, fast growth (averaged 1 meter tall at 10 months), less preferred by nibbling animals (and generally regrew when bitten off)

IMG_4066.JPG

IMG_4067.JPG

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Mid-winter Update

Have seen several nights dip down to -3C. Courtii plants are not looking healthy, progressively turning from green to brown.  Small seed Acuminata seems hit or miss, with 3 plants green and healthy, while 1 is drying up. A tiny Burkittii is green.  All the floribundas look good, but showing a lot of red pigmentation.  

(Photos are courtii, floribunda, acuminata) 

 

Big cold test coming up soon, with a few nights dipping to -7C. 

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USDA Zone 7 winter Acacia update:

Several nights down to -6C; one night dipped down to -10C. Every daytime rose above freezing.

 

All the courtii and floribunda appear either brown or pale/washed out. Small seed acuminata and burkittii remain the most green. 

 

First two photos are courtii. 

Next two photos are floribunda.

Final two photos are acuminata. 

89EEF162-9379-467A-AFD8-0844E552478F.jpeg

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19CB7ACC-CA5A-4790-AEBA-79FA81A8DE98.jpeg

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Hey.  Sorry to say most of them are dead.      maybe next time try using tree sleeves for the young plants.

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An observation, which led me to a question...

 

So, winter here basically turned various Acacias brown...but at least on the floribundas, the base remains green and the roots alive.  I expect they might regrow from the base come spring. 

 

If such a plant were to grow year after year as a deciduous perennial, then the only mass to accumulate would be underground. Is it known whether there are generally alkaloids down there, if they are already known to be in upper parts?

 

 

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7 hours ago, sabviewer said:

An observation, which led me to a question...

 

So, winter here basically turned various Acacias brown...but at least on the floribundas, the base remains green and the roots alive.  I expect they might regrow from the base come spring. 

 

If such a plant were to grow year after year as a deciduous perennial, then the only mass to accumulate would be underground. Is it known whether there are generally alkaloids down there, if they are already known to be in upper parts?

 

 

 

Acacia confusa root bark has alkaloids I believe. Can't imagine it would be any different for other species? Could be wrong :)

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Late winter update:

 

Most of the Acacia floribundas appear to be regrowing from the base now. 

...after USDA zone 7 winter

 

Seeds from New Zealand and Tasmanian provenance performed similarly. 

 

 

CDF5B4F5-59F8-4E42-B1D5-841A22F42217.jpeg

7491C4B2-7962-4C6F-AAE3-37BAA72C5F47.jpeg

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This wasp thing has been buzzing around my Phleb seedlings for like an hour or so. It doesnt wanna leave them alone. Its not interested in the acuminatas growing right next to them

Should I worry about it?

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You should probably let me hang onto those seedlings while you get your wasp infestation under control..

 

Nah, I can’t imagine that it would do any harm. Slugs, on the other hand, ate some of my seedlings pretty quickly before I spotted them. 

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21 hours ago, Dicko said:

Phleb seedlings

Ooo hit me up when these guys seed ;) 

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Which acacias do you plant out/ prefer to keep in pots?

I hear obtusi don't do great in pots

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33 minutes ago, TheMooseZeus said:

Ooo hit me up when these guys seed ;) 

I hope they get to that stage hahah :)

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