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The Corroboree
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Raising A.Phlebophylla

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New growth still looks good man so I wouldn't worry too much. Mine liked it better when I backed the sun off to only 8am-midday direct sun then ambient light.

But yeh it's lookin ok man! When I went to buff near all the plants were covered in dead Leaves like yours and I went at the peak of summer.

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^ [ # 204 ] Too much water ???

Edited by Heretic
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^ [ # 204 ] Too much water ???

Is this something that is known to happen to phleb's when they're given too much water? And I wouldn't have thought water every day when it's 40 degrees would be too much....... But that's why I'm asking, I don't know shit!

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i've lost a couple to overwatering in the past, primarily i think because they had recently been repotted up to bigger pots.

your symptoms don't look like that's the problem tho.

i'm with d00d with the partial afternoon shade thing for all my potted acacias.

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Have those phlebs been moved in the last few months ? If they've been in a position with lower light intensity, the old phyllodes will sometimes do that when the plant is moved to a position with more light. Newer phyllodes normally adapt without problems.

I'd knock the pot off them and check for any signs of something eating the roots. I get that sort of thing when ants move in to pots. Worms and nematodes can also cause a similar effect.

Although Acacias don't have true leaves what's going on is what as known as mature leaf necrosis.

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My suspicion is that the tree is simply undergoing its normal summer stress period and as a result its senescing its lover phyllodes. i visited my plants today and noticed the same pattern on my trees, and not on my shrubs.

this is a normal behavior in most plants as they mature. with the focus being on growing tips than on older growth that is of not much use anymore, such that older growth is senesced but not before mobile nutrients are recycled, ie resulting in the yellowing phyllodes/leaves. if the yellowing were happening on the new growth there would be much more reason for concern.

your trees may be stressed because they are in pots, but i wonder if this is a good time to be planting in the ground as they will undergo far more stress through transplanting at this time of year. personally i would wait till winter, but i wonder what other people would suggest. pots tend to dry out quick, so a would thing your watering regime is probably ok.

my trees are growing flower buds for a full bloom in the coming months. the flowers shown earlier not resulting in seeds. sorry with christmas goings didnt manage to capture photos this time around.

mine do get afternoon shade, but still have a some senescence.

Edited by obtuse
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Hello my first post here after a long time trying. I have some A. Phlebophylla seeds that I will be planting soon and will post when I have them in some soil and give a description of what I did and we can follow them and see what happens. Beat regards mjcorrboree.

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Wishing you success mjcorroboree.

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My phleb coming up to a year old. :)

post-13691-0-19593200-1458083714_thumb.j

All my photos end up side ways. :/

Edited by HolographicYou
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just like looking at a playboy centrefold ;)

damn nice, very sexy :D

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Can anyone give advice on how well phlebophylla tolerates clay soils?

I've just kicked off a batch and eventually I'd like them to be in the ground, but my soil is quite heavy and Rocky; I live on a ridgetop.

If they don't like the soil I'll dig out holes and replace the soil for them.

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i dont think they would really like clay soil too much.

 

more sandy, gritty, or dolerite sandstone based soils i would have thought.

 

my experience is sandy soils.

 

having said that i have had success with A. obtusifolia and A. florabunda in heavy clay soils.

 

EDIT:  duh.  got my soils wrong!

Edited by obtuse
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Obtusifolia love my soil.

I might be jumping the gun anyway, none of my seeds have popped yet anyway :/

I have removed the seed coats and I'll hope for the best.

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they dont like my dolerite clay on limited experience:(

 

EDIT - if I try in ground again, I am going to amend with laterite or granodiorite gravels for sure.

Other species not limited by climate, no probs thus far

Edited by waterboy 2.0

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Dont know why i was thinking dolerite.  sandstone or granite based soils better given closer to their environmental niche.

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highly weathered dolerite (real gritty stuff) might do the trick though obtuse (?), it does drain well when in that state. Mineral composition would be different though.....my clay is heavy as, and deep...lol...drains pathetically.

Edited by waterboy 2.0

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Sourced from a SAB member about 9 months ago, not looking to shabby.  Phyllode damage was caused by green metalic acacia leaf beetle, said beetle apparently only feeds for a few weeks of the year so I decided not to intervene(apart from the one I removed to id).20170105_135355.jpg

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