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Storm brews over glacier blunder - SMH

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A MISTAKE about the timing of melting glaciers has snowballed into an unprecedented assault on the credibility of climate science, after revelations that an author of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's report knew that one passage was wrong but included it anyway.

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/storm-brews-over-glacier-blunder-20100124-mslv.html

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has anyone seen that numbnut lord mumpton or whatever his name is...

Monckton_of_brenchley.jpg

Edited by xodarap

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Are you aware of the difference between heuristic and scientific reasoning.

I just thought I should clarify that heuristic judgements rely on cognitive shortcuts (quick ways to 'solve' problems or resolve cognitive dissonance through past experience/learned behaviours which reduce cognitive dissonance.

Prejudice is one example, ie judgements like: he looks like, others/tv say, religious conflict, conflict with other belief system eg. 'lets save the environment' beliefs.

Prejudice is a cognitive shortcut because rather than judging someone on their merits, you judge them on a belief you hold about others you have met in the past who seem to be similar or what you have been told in the past. This saves time and is necessary in many situations.

Cognitive dissonance is an informational conflict in the mind for example, my belief is 'x' and this does not fit with 'x' and is therefore usually rejected or has to be changed to resolve the dissonance. If my beliefs agree then the info is readily absorbed.

1)Info conflict

2)resolves using heuristic reasoning ie. namecalling, prejudice or 'all english people are whinges' is a schema based on heuristic reasoning. Generally just ad hominen rather than ad rem.

3)the apparent conflict is resolved and the person feels at ease and has staved off a threat to the ego.

People tend to use heuristic reasoning when threatened or distracted, or I hate to say it, have a low IQ, perhaps in situations when presented with confronting information.

Scientific reasoning will generally try to prove themselves wrong and will dismiss nothing simply based on an emotional judgement or popular belief/currently held belief. Generally scientist do not like idealistic and concrete truths, they prefer probabilities, any conflicting information is not rejected out of hand and goes towards further understanding.

Edited by ref1ect1ons

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has anyone seen that numbnut lord mumpton or whatever his name is...

Monckton_of_brenchley.jpg

A very very smart man! That numbnut may just save this country from making one of the biggest mistakes in history (after voting Krudd in of coarse).

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A very very smart man! That numbnut may just save this country from making one of the biggest mistakes in history (after voting Krudd in of coarse).

how? please explain... from all i can gather he's a pin-up boy for large industry & others whose interests($) are threatened by 'climate change'. theres no doubt there are other numbnuts that are using 'global warming' to rip people off etc thats no news flash. dodgy people are always going to try to find ways to rip people off & 'climate change' is used by fear mongers to manipulate people, just like 'terrorists' etc. but he believes that global warming is a complete fallacy. i don't agree & i feel it's dangerous for us at this stage of the game to have such alot of publicity supporting this idea & allowing members of the public to latch onto it & remain in denial that we are fucking things up & that things need to change. thats why i think he's a numbnut

Edited by xodarap

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