spooge

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About spooge

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    tawdry afterthought

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    warm and cold
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    cactus always -
    mushrooms in winter.

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    southern australia

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  1. All gone now, thank you to the people who donated - happy viewing.
  2. Yes, instructions in the op. Cool, instructions in the op.
  3. Hello Noshiewa, i may be have the ones Galukus may not have, semd me a pm amd i can send you some pics etc.
  4. Defo not subs man, maybe hyphaloma sp.
  5. Thats really great Eem, THANK YOU so much for doing that.
  6. Thank you Glaukus and Cubism for the nice words. These trees are exciting to grow. interesting Glaukus that Longifolia add instead of depleating, in your experience do these two types of acacia grow close together and amongst each other in habitat? Olive is good at barking and cleaning dishes Cubism, i should make her a harness and little trailer to cart wood around.
  7. an update.............. Acacia are wonderful. Courtii - These have mostly done well, the water rats give them a bit of hassle undermining them etc, the root disturbance doesn't seem to bother them as yet, they will lean a lot though if the rats are mining under them, so i have them staked. The water rats are part of the ecology here, they airate the soil and feed the nanking kestrels and perform functions i wouldn't even know about so i can't poison them however much i may want to sometimes. The courtii leaves discolour in the drier areas in summer and in the wetter areas in winter, couple of losses in the very wet areas, overall they are a wonderful majestic and hardy tree. Longifolia / Obtusafolia hybrids - fastest growing of them all, would make great rehabilitation trees for wet area erosion - fast, hardy and robust. They have done very well in the wetter areas, couple of losses in the really wet areas and some have fallen over in high winds. Many will flower soon. I am a bit concerned they will pollinate they obtusafolia and dilute the line. Maidenii - Shoulda got more pics of these, I've grouped these trees on a couple of spots on the slope of a dam, they can handle very wet conditions in heavy clay and are doing well, they do go a nice reddish colour in winter and then return to green over summer. Slow to start but take off when they hit waist height. They tolerate low light and can handle growing in the vicinity of tall gums well. Floribunda - Second in growth rate to the longifolia hybrids though still very fast, have these planted along a boundary fence line in a very dry position in summer, lotsa rain in winter. Second pic is the first planting, now 3 years old from tube stock. They were covered in flowers again. Acuminata - When i first started planting these i concentrated the plantings on a north facing slope thats very dry in summer. This slope is home to a massive colony of water rats so there is lots of soil disturbance going on. Decided to risk a few in some wetter areas and have been surprised that they have lived and have grown well in wetter areas as well. In some of these clay/damp areas they have grown faster than some obtusafolia. be interesting to see if they will live to be 20yrs in these wet areas or if they may not cope with as they get older, especially if we have freak rainfall one winter....... The water rats mining under them on the north facing slope doest seem to bother them, Some are beginning to flower, more should flower soon. Obtusafolia - Lovely, kinda fast but slow as well, lost a couple in areas that are too wet, they tolerate the clay and the dry summer better than i thought they would, colour up nicely in winter, the red stems on the fresh growth are beautiful and glow against the green background. A couple of the larger ones flowered last year, lots more have flowers this year. Confusa - Was a bit of a gamble and some fun planting these, i had no idea really when i planted them what i was doing, i just thought i should put them somewhere where they have good drainage and can dry out in winter. North facing slope home to water rats = lotsa soil disturbance. Some have lived and are establishing them selves, I've left the wraps on them so they can warm up a bit in winter and get some moisture in summer. How they will go in the future will be interesting to watch. Phlebophyla - The first lot of these we got i was so very careful with, had them in pots for 2 years as i felt i had to get them to a decent size before 'risking' putting them in the ground. We have exposed areas of rocks which would have been nice to plant these trees in on the property but not really in areas that are practical to access, they are also exposed, i wasn't sure if they would need summer watering and if they would handle these exposed areas. Solution was to plant them in the 'garden', close to a tap so they could be watered if needed, was essential to plant them on a slope in my mind so they have very good drainage, the slope they are planted on gets full winter and summer sun for periods of the day but is protected from high winds. The oldest ones will flower for their second time year, no seeds from them as yet. The second batch of tress we got i have risked a little, planted them on the levy of a dam, a protected spot thats very clay, does dry out a lot in summer though, theres retic there, haven't had to use it. Its nice to watch them grow and the groupings starting to bush up creating homes and food for lotsa things. Starting this years plantings...... Ive found for the conditions here its best to pot up the tube stock when i get them and keep them in the shade house and grow them to waist/chest high for 6+ months and then plant them out in autumn after the first couple rains and keep planting till spring. This way I've been getting about 90% success rate compared to 60% planting strait out into the ground from tube. The tree wraps have helped heaps with warmth and moisture they also protect the base of the trees from rabbits. Im up to my third use on some of them, the wraps last but the stakes do rot off at soil level and need to be replaced after a year or two. Visited phlebophyla in habitat a couple months ago the trees were coming to flower, bout 6 weeks in front of the ones here, i took only memories and pics.
  8. Hello. Ive some subaeruginosa prints on foil for microscopy only. Happy to send you how many prints youd like if you donate $5 for each print to the forum hosting costs - message me a screen shot of your donation, the number of prints you have 'bought' and the addy youd like the prints sent to once you have donated your money and your print(s) will be sent promptly. Prints will be well packed but will not be sent with tracking, $1 stamp only, this being the case if for some reason your print(s) dont arrive then i wont resend, check out my trade feedback for conformation that alls good. if your after a silly amount of prints and have donated in excess of $50 to the forum then i will pay for tracking for your letter. Australia only.
  9. This is a great thread, thank you for sharing your stuff WB
  10. Thanks Obtuse. Maybe this summer i can sell enough plants to pay for full genome sequencing of subaeruginosa n then we will have results to asess finds like these against
  11. if the snails and slugs beat Glaukus to it hit me up and i will print some for people
  12. Id like some if not to late, chilly and wet winter where i live, mild, kinda shortish summer. happy to send you back some tricho seeds. Id like a grove of these trees in my garden. pics of some subaeruginosa fruiting around tbms and bridgesii to demonstrate my ethno gardening prowess.
  13. Thanks for doing that eem, that's great!. i found the ones I typed out on a phone the other day...... Soon they will be up again and I will get more samples. i have prints if anyone has a nice microscope to see what the spores look like, be interesting to see if the spores of either of the samples match subaeruginosa.
  14. Hello Morg, what pics are in the OP is all the info i have or was sent by alvalab. I will collect these samples again this season and have them tested again, i will list the tests that alvalab offer on this thread and hopefully people will let me know which tests to get done. Ive prints of both types if looking at them will help? Ive naturalised the 'freak gills' to my garden, they have fruited two years running, this year will hopefully be the year that the white gills also fruit. Ive not the time to search and vet an australian place that will do the tests for me, if someone has or knows of a place in australia where these samples can be tested then please let me know, would need to be a commercial operation where i can pay for the service and not a backyard 'maybe we will get it done or not' etc freebie..... I was a non beleiver also till i came to SA - where you can find a remnant peices of bush and in it are huge never logged eucalypts and you find three of these huge trees together, around the base of one feeding on the celulose in the fallen bark are an indigenous cortinarius, around the base of the tree next to it is an indigenous mycenea and next to that indigenous subaeruginosa fruiting, not in droves like a pine patch but select larger fruits, the full seasons flush visable from old manky to fresh pins. Here like all states in aus there are areas where the introduced fungi have not made it yet, these are the areas that 'tell' me that subs are indeed an indigenous sp.
  15. The international mycologist is very busy, I get responses to my messages Wile, still waiting to hear if the sample I sent him first before alvalab has been found. This is why I went with alvalab as when you pay for a service it usually gets completed a bit faster. I had let this go and was content with the 98% from alvalab and 99% from a local mycologist who viewed the results also, Then i sent the results to the international guy and it's all in the air again as he is quite sure just from external characteristics that I have at least 1 different species that may not be a sub in the 3 samples. Was around 80eu to have the 3 samples tested Anodyne, you pay for the services you require from a list. Took around 6 weeks including post time of 7-10 days to get the results back and then a futher week as I asked for another test to be done to tryn narrow down the extra 2% thing. Im confused as well man. Tryn to get this done so I have a definitive answer on at least one of the samples is frustrating. I've no idea but I think I need a result that says 100% like the first sample in the pics, then I will be happy. Mushroom tests prolly don't work like that, who knows...... Im all for keeping the things we find here, here. Prob is though the whole Psilocybe mushroom thing here is so covert. Even transporting the sample or samples to a herbarium one would risk prosecution, prob can get an official letter etc, Pablo offers to upload the data for a fee to Genbank which I will prob do, once I have a definitive answer one way or the other on what the 2 samples are that are still in question. This season I will collect samples of the 2 odd subs and have them tested agian, I may go with a couple labs and get the full range of tests done so the data is there for everyone to analyse. Both these mushroom grow in quite isolated places, in pine coups, that were once bush.