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hava

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About hava

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    Psychonaut

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    Male
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    Land near water

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  • Climate or location
    Coastal sub-tropical
  1. thank you very much for the logo critique, i appreciate it. they were rushed and it shows i think.
  2. Ok sorry, had the album set as private...
  3. and imagine there are other logos with different designs and colours and stuff...
  4. hava

    T.W.A.T

    Michael Jackson
  5. Found "Wild Medicine in Australia" by A.B & J.W Cribb in a local second hand bookstore recently. First published '81, I have the '88 reprint. My apologies for any spelling errors or 'politically incorrect' names, this is hand typed from the book. Let me know if you would like me to expand on any of the text. Chapter list: 1. Plants in Medicine 2. The Aboriginal Pharmacopoeia 3. Bush Remedies of the Pioneers 4. The European Tradition - Herbal Cures & Nostrums 5. Contributions from Other Cultures 6. Purely for Pleasure - Narcotics and Aphrodisiacs 7. Australian Plants in Modern Medicine 8. Animal, Vegetable, Mineral - Medicines and Treatments from Natural Sources Here is a condensed list of native plants and usage/notes in the chapter titled "Purely for Pleasure - Narcotics and Aphrodisiacs" Adriana glabrata BITTER BUSH Leaves dried as tobacco by aboriginals. Stock poison? Regarded as useful forage plant by some? Qld, NSW, Vic, WA, NT Amorphophallus STINKING ARUM 19th century Daly River missionary recorded dried leaves were smoked giving an anaesthetic effect, similiar to ether or chloroform in effect. 'A short smoke makes one sleepy; if he smoke too long he will not awaken. While so sleeping he is, they say, unconscious of pain.' Unknown which species, A. galbra and A. variabilis occur in the NT. Qld, NT. Callicarpa longifolia CHUKIN Japanese along the Johnstone River in North Qld used the bark as a substitute for Piper betle leaf for chewing with areca. Plant contains toxic principle, reputed fish poison. Medicinal use in Malaysia, poultice for fevers, treating mouth and throat infections, gargle/mouthwash from leaves or bark. Qld Dodonaea WILD HOPS, HOP-BUSH Resembles true hops, not related. Used by early pioneer brewers to use as substitute, actually turned out pretty good... nice and bitter. D. angustissima, the slender hop-bush, gets a special mention. D. viscosa leaves chewed in Peru like coca leaves... hop bush leaves have been used to adulterate/cut coca. Leaves and bark contain an alkaloid. D. angustissima: All mainland states D. viscosa: Qld, NSW, Vic, Tas., SA, NT Duboisia hopwoodii PITURI The usual information. Of interest was possibly this paragraph: "Preparation of the material for use was by roasting, moistening perhaps by chewing, and rolling with ashes into a quid about 5 cm long, a little more than 1 cm thich. Sometimes fibrous material was mixed in, either kangaroo hairs or threads from Psoralea, a pea flowered shrub. The ash used for preference was that of Acacia salicina, a wattle with a high content of calcium sulphate; it is thought this allowed the slow release of the alkaloid. When not being chewed or sucked, the roll was carried behind the ear, in much the way children of Western civilizations 'park' their chewing gum.' and 'D. hopwoodii is a poisonous plant, and has a reputation of causing fatalities to stock. One of its common names in the inland is camel poison. It was widely used by the aborigines as an aid in catching emus. Twigs or leaves of the plant were put in small waterholes where the emus were known to drink. The birds became stupified and walked in circles, 'Him drunk, all same white fellow', and were easily caught. This practice was widespread where the plant grew, even in araes where it was not used as a narcotic; it was so common that a writer in 1874 advised that 'people travelling would be wise to avoid using water from these drinking places, or any small hole of surface water, as the blacks often put in some preparation to stupify the emu.' Qld, NSW, SA, WA, NT Eucalyptus GUM TREE A 'blend of dried leaves' were used to make 'a quite smokable cigarette tobacco with a soft, bush fragrance flavour'. The cigarettes were marketed with the advertising slogan 'Take a whiff of the gum forests into your home' and thought by some to give relief from bronchitis and asthma. No specific species. Eucalyptus gunnii CIDER GUM, RIBBONY GUM Tasmanian gum with high sugar content, can be tapped like a sugar maple. Holes were bored in the trunk and the treacle-tasting sweet liquor was collected in a hole at the base. The hole was kept covered with flat stones for protection from animals. Natural fermentation from wild yeasts occurred after a time and intoxicating liquor resulted. Popular among everyone. Evolvulus alsinoides var. sericeus SKY CONVOLVULUS Pituri substitute. Unknown alkaloid content. Early reputation as cure for dysentery, used as a tonic, febrifuge and vermifuge in India. Qld, NSW, SA, WA, NT Galbulimima belgraveana ARGARA New Guinea the bark as waken as a hallucinogen; warriors chewed it before tribal fights, and also rubbed it on their legs. It produces violent intoxication and hallucinations followed by extreme drowsiness. 28 different alkaloids isolated from the bark, including himandrine and himbacine. Qld Heteropogon contortus BUNCH SPEAR GRASS Masticatory narcotic 'chewed like tobacco' in Broome area. Dedoction as cough medicine. Indian medicine uses root as stimulant and diuretic, also for rheumatism. Qld, NSW, WA, NT Isotoma petraea ROCK BLUEBELL, EURO FINGERS Used as pituri chewed with ash or drunk for narcotic effect. Alkaloids similar to nicotine, and was regarded as 'strong chew', reportedly described by one group of aborigines as 'cheeky bugger'. Used as painkilled amongst tribes of the Kalgoorlie area; plant was dried over a fire, powdered and mixed with ash of mulga bark; a little of the mixture, when swallowed, was said to produce a 'burning and deadening sensation in the stomach'. In some other areas dry sticks of the plant were chewed. Intensely bitter milky sap, suspected stock poison. Lysiphyllum carronii BAUHINIA Tribes in an area to the NW of Birdsville in far WQld. '...flowers of bauhinia were pounded in a wooden dish, the liquid was drained into a another vessel and mixed with sugary contents of the honey ant, Melophorus. (Honey ants have the abdomen swollen to a centimetre or more and filled with stored sugary solution.) The mixture was allowed to ferment for eight to ten days, giving a liquor described as semi-fermented. Probably it would be no worse than many other home brews.' Nicotiana INGULBA, NATIVE TOBACCO 'Although the pituri, Duboisia hopwoodii, is certainly the best known chewing narcotic used by the Aborigines, it seems from studies by anthropologists and comments from explorers, missionaries and settlers, that is was not the plant used over in the greater part of central Australia. In some cases it was reported that the chewing wad of dried leaves was wrapped, somewhat in the fashion of a cigar, in the leaf of the same species; this would not be possible with D. hopwoodii which as very narrow, stiff leaves. It has been shown that the commonly used narcotic plants of Central Australia were two or more species of Nicotiana. This is the genus to which tobacco belongs, and it is interesting that the aborigines should have founf such closely related plants to use for a similar purpose to chewing tobacco. The method of use is similar to that described above for pituri: leaves could be chewed fresh but were often dried by heat, kneaded into small balls with the teeth, then dried in a thumb-sized lump to keep for later use. As with pituri ash was generally added before mastication; the ash was usually of an Acacia or Cassia or Ventilago; the wad was used by sucking or rolling in the mouth. In a friendly custom, the plug might be passed from one to another for a chew, and the owner would then replace it behind his ear, or perhaps in his armband, to save for later. Men only used the chewing plug, but women were permitted to chew fresh leaves. A report by J. M. Black, the eminent South Australian botanist, states: 'Natives value the plant much, and when the camels approached it they became very excited and pulled up the plants and placed them up on the rocks out of reach of the dreaded animals.' The principal species seemed to have been: N. excelsior SA, NT N. gossei Qld, SA, NT N. rosulata subsp. ingulba NSW, SA, WA, NT Papaver somniferum OPIUM POPPY The usual information; 'occurring as a weed of cultivation in scattered areas' Qld, NSW, Vic., Tas., SA Amanita muscaria FLY AGARIC Vic. Copelandia cyanescens BLUE MEANIES 'This fungus has been reported to contain psilocybin, and is one of the species producing hallucinations. Before such an effect became desirable in some circles, there were cases of inexperienced mushroom gatherers being accidentally poisoned by eating it.' Qld Psilocybe cubensis GOLD TOP, HYSTERIA TOADSTOOL The following would be talking about '61 or earlier. 'Twenty years or so ago we heard fairly regularly on the radio about cases or toadstool poisoning, where the victimes either suffered frightening visions or felt extraordinary hilarity; warnings were broadcast about this 'hysterical mushroom', describing its yellow peaked cap, long stalk, dark gills, and habit of growing on dung. When the source of the poisoning was identified as Psilocybe cubensis, it was realized that the active principal was similar to that used to produce hallucinations and religious experiences in Central and South America and Mexico. The cult which built up at about that time in the United States spread to this country, and deliberate use of the drug has spread, despite its illegality. There are in Australia two other species of Psilocybe, P. semilanceata and P. subaeruginosa, which have been found to contain the same sort of active principle. The drug is one of the psychomimetic, or mind-bending, toxins, and may have varying effects on different individuals, or even on the same individual at different times. Qld, NSW Native Aphrodisiacs Archidendron grandiflorum (Pithecellobium grandiflorum) FAIRY PAINTBRUSH, GIN'S LIPS Abarema grandiflora Denhamia obscura Psychotria fitzalani Balanophora fungosa DRUMSTICKS Lycopodium phlegmaria COMMON TASSEL FERN Phallus rubicundus A STINKHORN Pittosporum venulosum Viscum articulatum LEAFLESS MISTLETOE Contraceptive Plants (inc. emmenagogues) Calamus australis LAWYER CANE leaves, stem Capsella bursapastoris SHEPHERD'S PURSE leaves Cassytha filiformis BUSH DODDER stems Casuarina equisetifolia COASTAL SHEOAK leaves, bark, stem Chenopodium album FAT-HEN leaves Commersonia fraseri BLACKFELLOWS' HEMP leaves Cymbidium madidum ARROWROOT ORCHID fruit Dicranopteris linearis CORAL FERN leaves Dioscorea bulbifera AERIAL YAM roots Entada phaseoliodes MATCHBOX BEAN fruits Euodia alata leaves Flagellaria indica SUPPLEJACK leaves Heritiera littoralis LOOKING-GLASS TREE leaves Hibiscus tiliaceus COTTON TREE leaves Hernandia peltata LANTERN TREE leaves, bark, stem Ipomoea pes-caprae subsp. brasiliensis GOAT'S-FOOT CONVOLVULUS leaves, stem Lygodium microphyllum CLIMBING MAIDENHAIR FERN leaves Macaranga tanarius TUMKULLUM leaves Morinda citrifolia MORINDA fruits M. reticulara (Morinda?) leaves Murdannia graminea SLUG HERB leaves Polygonum hydropiper WATER PEPPER leaves Pongamia pinnata INDIAN BEECH roots Rubus moluccanus NATIVE RASPBERRY stems Terminalia catappa INDIAN ALMOND leaves Urena lobata PINK BURR leaves, bark
  6. hava

    T.W.A.T

    Chai Latte
  7. fake, written by someone much older, which i guess makes it childish... it all evens out maybe
  8. hava

    T.W.A.T

    rainbow dash
  9. hava

    T.W.A.T

    continuum
  10. hava

    T.W.A.T

    Grease
  11. hava

    T.W.A.T

    Jim Morrison
  12. http://www.herballegacy.com/Ulcers.html I found this via a search for plantain and bleeding stomach. It also mentions cayenne pepper to cauterize the bleeding. Worth a try, both readily available. My thoughts are with her.
  13. jah (or however you relate to the ONE and ALL) getting up early my family caring for plants encouraging others smiling eyes melting into the moment... the feeling of unfolding into NOW... then the wave of appreciation and awe of how miraculous it is that we are even... whatever we are. here? alive? visible? sacred? salmonella dub carbon based lifeforms fat freddys drop seeing seeds sprouting for the first time in the morning when i check...WOOHOO a beautiful freshly ground espresso coffee.. even out of my crappy steam machine eating delicious vegetarian meals... especially when i know they have been cooked with devotion... the (natural) euphoria i get when i am walking with devotion to the all seeing my dreadlocks and being reminded of why i have them seeing a facet of myself reflected in the world for the first time seeing the divinity in others eyes LIFE
  14. Woah. Not exactly what I meant, but I would be finding a new doctor... one that specialises in medicine and ... healing. I wouldn't expect any reasonable doctor would dismiss vomiting blood as being 'in our head'. The original wording suggests multiple doctors also... this implies a likelyhood of combined decades of medical experience, with maybe a conservative amount of consultancies being around 10000? (5/day x 200 x 10). Why are the doctors dismissing this case? They make mistakes in their field, as we all do, but like it or not they really are experts in their field and style of treatment (fixing rather than prevention). Blood in vomit sounds like physical damage to the body structure.. this is serious and would need for example a diagnostic mechanic rather than a tune up. If the GP's won't help, save some bloody vomit and go to the emergency ward of the hospital. Something sounds odd about this situation. For example, I have never heard of a doctor dismissing a broken leg as being 'in our head'. tldr; This sounds serious, get a new doctor.
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