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The Corroboree

Lophophora cristata

Got a pretty good deal on this beauty, a third of the price of some much smaller crests I've seen sold.

 

I intend on using some BAP to make it pup and propagate it. I've only ever used BAP on trichos, any of you have experience with it on lophs?

 

I'm not sure if this particular williamsii is self-pollinating but I'll find out soon as it's already in flower. I'd rather it's not self-pollinating so I can cross it with my variegated one which should hopefully flower for the 1st time this season.

 

Hoping this would make seeds with a higher rate of mutants.


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MeanGreen's Ethnobotanical Garden

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Bap away my friend. Definitely works for Lophs. In the mean time a crested variegate... I'm with you... that would be a very nice cross indeed. Failing that, a caespitosa type would not be bad either to add into the works.

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Not a bad idea, I do have a flowering caespitosa I could try this with. Provided this one isn't self-pollinating that is. I'm seeing many dried flowers but no pods remnants so fingers crossed (no pun intended)

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Self pollinating flowers must simply have their anthers removed prior to pollen maturing. Easy fix. Get er done.

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True but the window is short and the pollen is ready as soon as the flower opens it seems like. So removing the anthers without any pollen hitting the pistil is pretty difficult imo. Worth a try though, for sure, but hard to tell if the cross was successful or not.

Edited by MeanGreen

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Frozen pollen stays viable for more than a year. A razor blade can be used to cut into a flower and remove the anthers before it opens. Definitely helps to have a magnifying glass of some sort though if you wish to examine the pistil prior to pollination for possible self-fertilization i.e. tell tale signs of its own pollen being present such as pollen grains you did not place yourself.

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Placing immature anthers in the refrigerator with a little cover over them to protect them from drying out can also let the pollen mature in anthers collected in that manner as well with many plants. Food for thought if your up to saving them and trying to make another cross with your destroyed anthers.

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That's a good idea, I can definitely sacrifice a flower to give it a shot. I asked the seller if the plant pollinates itself, we'll see what he says.

 

Here's another piece of the same plant:

s-l400.jpg

 

And some life goals:

d619a412243e7be241be336c4a73e3f6.jpg

Edited by MeanGreen
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